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Hello all
Assembly questions as i refit the bits and pieces to my GTV I come across puzzles on the order of things etc, especially the parts that were stripped off prior to my ownership, so I'd appreciate any and all help provided.
I have searched the forum but this question didn't turn up.

This Question is for the RHD 10548 (1750 GTV series 2) owners (Floor mounted pedals with dual circuit master).
The bolts that fix both brake and clutch masters through the chassis rail have a 8mm spacer floating between the washers and I don't know which way / side / where they spacers go. ie Between the rail and clutch cylinder or rail and brake cylinder?
Oh and what torque for the nuts?

Thanks in advance

Jon
 

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Jon,

It should be quite easy to figure this out for yourself. Essentially, you have to ensure that the travel of the clutch and brake rods is 100% parallel to the direction of travel of the pedals themselves. Although there is a certain amount of tolerance at the clutch/brake MC end of the rods, the clevis needs to be perfectly perpendicular to the hardened pin connecting it to the lower tip of the pedal. This means that the imaginary centre line running through the clutch/brake MC bores has to be aligned with the centre of the bottom point of the pedals. OK, so we're clear on that :). So, refit the pedal box (which you have taken apart and regreased with heavy graphite, at the very least, I hope!), then fit the two master cylinders without any of these spacers. Next, either using your eyeball or a straight edge of some kind, work out (using the principles explained above) whether each individual MC needs to be moved inboard or outboard in order to align itself perfectly with the imaginary line. It might require fitting further spacers, or different spacers, or none at all. That's up to your judgment. Once you've established that the MCs are in the correct position and have shimmed them appropriately (most people would just use a stack of washers) then you're good to go.

Of course, if you have a lathe, a pillar drill and (possibly) a small welder too, you can re-make the clevis ends and machine a couple of new pins if there is excessive slop in the old ones. This will help, and will be inevitable if the MCs have been misaligned for years. I spent two entire weekends rebuilding my pedal box, doing all the work described above, but this did include machining the spacers from scratch and rebushing the pedal box itself (not easy). The results are definitely worth it, because none of the pivot points are now binding in any way and the pedal action is consequently much smoother.

If none of this makes any sense, perhaps someone might be kind enough to post a scan of the linkages diagram contained in the workshop manual. It will make everything much clearer. Still, I hope this helps!

Alex.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Alex.
Have just come out from under the car having done lots of thinking, fitting and refitting. After a bit of trial and error I sorted the spacer location issue and in hindsight it's bleeding obvious... The Brake MC has a 50mm dome with a bleed screw. Without the spacers the MC would not fit next to the chassis rail as the dome edge projected past the MC mounting flanges.
I've pinched the nuts, but will certainly take your advice regarding alignment.

The pedal box is apart and you mention using Heavy Graphite grease. Is this necessary or would another grease be OK - like wheel bearing grease?

While I was under I started to install the hydraulic lines. Jeepers... what a tangle of tubes and I have no idea how they actually fit in. They were off the car when I received it and most of them have been bent out of shape just enough to not naturally fit anywhere obvious.
I don't suppose anyone would be kind enough to take a series of photos (or a link) showing the routing and order of the lines from the MC to the fluid reservoirs??


Cheers
Jon
 

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I used heavy graphite grease as it's what they would have used (ought to have used?!) at the factory. It's extremely heavyweght and will collect in the dimpled surface of the thinwall bushes in the pedals. Wheel bearing grease will probably want to migrate out and disappear, so I'd try to hunt down some of the 'good stuff' if I were you! Try an agricultural supplier. Failing that, dry graphite powder mixed to a very stiff paste with a small amount of wheel bearing grease would work just as well.

Can't really offer any help with the pipe routing issue as my car only has a single circuit system, but as a guide you might find that the chassis still has the bendable metal tabs which should fold around and secure the pipes. From those you ought to be able to trace a route. From memory, the Alfaholics website has several useful photos of one of their GTA replicas during the build-up process showing the path of the brake lines, but I might be mistaken!
 
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