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Discussion Starter #1
Dear sirs,
I am considering the purchase of an Alfa Romeo 1750 GTV (ideally Series I but not picky) as a long-term daily driver. I am currently 25 years old and by long-term I mean keeping the car until petrol is no longer sold or I can no longer drive it.

The reason for my posting on this group is the following: If you have advice on

1. What I need to do to prepare the car for long-term use. I am currently in the UK but only expect to be here for five years before moving to a warmer climate.

2. How much higher would the yearly costs on a £30,000-£40,000 GTV be compared to a similar modern car of the same price? Excluding insurance and fuel which I can easily calculate. Eg mechanical maintenance, bodywork maintenance. How much does it cost to waxoyl the car and how much does it help with rust? Are there any other things I should look out for?

I’d like to purchase a car with the stock engine, to avoid future complications. I don’t expect it to be cheaper than buying and replacing a modern every 5-10 years, I’d just like to get an idea of the marginal costs. Doing 5000-10000 miles a year.

Thank you for your advice!
 

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I would seriously reconsider your desire to use these vehicles as daily drivers.....purely from the safety point of view. For weekend and the odd spirited drive down the back roads or to and fro car shows....sure....that's what I aim to do with mine. These cars have practically no driver protection other than basic seat belts....no front or side air bags and no ABS. They're low by modern car standards and can be difficult to spot on the blind side and from behind by the more upright and tall SUV's and trucks that we see more of on the roads these days. Just my 2CW.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I appreciate your concern. I am aware of the lack of airbags and ABS. I have a VW Beetle that, although I have not been driving it daily, I've been driving it 2-3 times a week for the last five years. I have also driven a 1750 GTV before. I also suspect that the vehicle population in Canada is different compared to the UK and Cyprus, with a much greater percentage of SUVs and light trucks.
Thank you for your reply.
 

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Yes that is very true I do live in an ever expanding metropolitan area and for the past couple of decades pick up trucks and SUV's have been some of the best selling vehicles .....I attribute this to the relatively low cost of financing and cheap oil. If such is not in your case you are very lucky indeed ....one day I hope to move out to the country where open roads can still be found.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yeah, petrol costs are definitely higher here. However, it must be nice for you to live in such an area.
With regard to comparative costs and modifications for long-term driving, would you have any thoughts?
 

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This is a head and heart debate.

I would say buy the best most solid example you can. Dinitrol or wax oil treatments should be a given.
Also consider journey type - local A and B roads or long motorway trips?
Expect lots of washing down and maintenance. Also storage (garage?).

I couldn't put my car through that (when it finally hits the road). The English winters and road salt are just to brutal without washing/rinsing etc etc.

I would say use it on good weather and pleasure days, and buy a £500 hack to take the pain. I think financially it makes more sense too.
 

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..when you factor in running costs, maintenance costs, repairs costs etc versus a £500 banger. The 500 hack is cheaper than the 600-700 cost of getting it professionally waxoiled alone (obviously you can diy).

The 500 banger would probably be safer and arguably more reliable, certainly cheaper to run. And if it breaks or fails MOT you just scrap it and get another.
 

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To prep it for daily use the best things you can do are:
Check and replace all the electrics
Consider upgrading ignition and distributor to electronic
Check and service all mechanical parts
Fit good winter tyres in winter
Pay for the best rustproofing service you can afford
Most importantly the best thing you can do to prep it for daily use is........... to use it. The more you use an old car the more reliable it gets.

But even with these efforts I'd still worry about daily use, partly because of the safety thing and partly because of the wear and tear on the car, particularly bodywork.

Your mechanical maintenance on a fully sorted car doing say 5-8000 miles a year shouldn't be more than £1-2k a year on average.
 

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That is a very good question. So your fixed cost is the car, and the cost to run it like tyres, oils, coolant, spark plugs and minor repairs (i.e. replacing water pump) are the variable costs. Don't forget wear and tear on seats and carpets. If you use an electronic module distributor, that may cut down on the cost of tune ups.
So if your engine was at standard dimensions for the crank, with new piston and liners and new valves etc. Your gearbox had all new bearings and syncros and sleeves and (new gears and shafts would be great) and your diff was rebuilt with new bearings (new crown wheel and pinion would be great). So your car will need to be as close as you can get to what the car was when it left the factory to minimize variable costs (my opinion).

The GTV cars were only expected to last 12 years by the factory and now we (I) are talking about making them last 100 years.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you for your response, BigMart. It's mostly local A and B roads. i don't expect to stay in the UK for more than 3-4 years before I move to sunnier climes. I am sure that it's quite punishing here over the years in terms of rust.
I do agree that financially the £500 banger is probably a better option, I'm currently driving a £1500 car in the UK. However, I think I'd like to drive something nice for the long-term, and therefore I was comparing it to, let's say, a new or nearly new BMW 3-series every 5-10 years. How much higher the costs would be compared to that.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks, Bertiebloke. Are the tyres in any way more expensive than regular tires? How much would it cost to replace the electrics and change ignition to electronic? I would use it, so that would be a positive.
Steve105, such a condition would be great, but I assume it would cost a lot. Do you have any idea how much it would be to separately bring the engine, gearbox and differential to such a condition?
I agree that perhaps we are not behaving like the theories about planned obsolescence. Is it worth it?Financially probably not. In terms of quality of life, I don't know. I've considered both the £500 car again and again, and the Audi A4-style car every 5-10 years again and again. So I'm trying to find out more about how much this option would cost.
 

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I say suck it and see. You can always change your mind later.
If you use the car every day, you are bound to experience more everyday wear and tear (dirt, scratches, car park bumps), but if you save the car for Sunday best, you only get to drive it on Sundays. I get to drive mine most days.
Tyres are tyres. Pick the type and stickiness which matches how you want to drive.
Electronic distributor say $300.
How much servicing will you do yourself? These cars are pretty simple. They might not be as bulletproof as a modern Toyota, but if you are able to check and change oil, plugs and filters yourself, servicing costs will be negligible. Fiddly things like carb balancing can be learned, or won't cost much by itself. Plus you will get a sense of satisfaction from doing it yourself.
Don't forget to factor in the usual hundreds-of-dollars cam belt swap you won't have to do every 3 years.
My 2 cents... But to me the use of the car should reflect what you'd like to do, not what you 'should'.
 

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I agree with Ranz, do it.

My experience driving older cars is that you have to schedule time for the constant maintenance. However, you are rewarded by the engaging driving experience.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Hi

You said " .. I have also driven a 1750 GTV before. .." Then I don't understand your question. If you have driven a GTV before, you should be hooked. It's like taking Cocaine, normally one dose is enough to get the addiction going.

All your other questions about cost and the like can be answered by Mr. Google or by calling the vendors in question.

If you have the financial means, and a garage or covered parking space, then buy a GTV.

Bye
 

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Hahaha thank you Milanoguy. Well, I just want to step into it with my eyes open...
I'm not sure you really are an Alfista ... eyes open! ;)

I'm currently driving my 2001 156v6 daily. Yes a lot younger and probably a stronger shell but I spend a lot of time checking the mirror (today for example I passed a car purely to get away from a tailgater), and I do park it carefully (wish we had undercover parking). If my 1750GTV was finished and I had safe parking at work, I'd drive it.

Pete
 

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I drove my 1972 GTV and 1970 GTJ daily for a couple of years each. At the time I was a management consultant so I'd rack up 25 - 50 km/day in four to six trips per day. Best thing ever - I intend my 1966 GSGTV to be a daily driver.

Cliche but true: my dad always said get a decent chassis - mechanicals can be fixed. Assuming you get a car with a decent body then waxoyl would seem to be decent insurance as you say you want to hang onto it.

Basic maintenance will cost you the same (or less) than a modern car - oil changes etc. if not DIY can be done by any mechanic and you won't get stung for all the diagnostics and rubbish that come with a modern car service - the whole "log book service" thing is a scam even away from the dealer service networks. Also most modern "12 mth/15,000km" service intervals are not, there is always a recommended service at 6 mths.

If the car you buy is already a daily driver (and is sold for genuine reasons, not to kick a problem down the road) you can expect it to be well sorted out. The guy who bought my GTV reckoned it was the best he'd ever had (out of four or so), all I ever did to it was replace rear shocks (which I didn't spot when I bought it) and some suspension bushes. Otherwise it had simply had 33 years of settling in.

Then when something eventually gives up you will find it is again cheaper than a modern car because there are no "black boxes" to be replaced at exorbitant cost - individual parts can be had and quite cheaply if you're happy with aftermarket, and often you can fix it yourself.

Upgrade your head- and taillights and think about dual booster circuits - I once lost the front booster in the GTV on the freeway, which I was not aware of until the exit ramp - heading for a red light at 100km/h and vastly reduced braking power gave me a moment's pause...

Lastly simplicity is everything. The selespeed transmission on my 156 cost me $$hundreds for an electronics problem I never 100% understood - would never have happened with the trusty 5-speed in a 105.

You will pay more for petrol!! Drive any 105 coupe (1300 to 2000) as it deserves and you aren't going to get 5l/100km!!>:)
 

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My daily driver is a lot different to my weekend driver but it certainly helps me appreciate the weekends.
CAUTION BE CAREFUL WHO YOU EMPLOY caught this bludger laying down on the job.
 

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