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During the past 30 years, I've owned five different 1750's (Spica & carbs, hanging & floor pedals, series 1 and 2's, etc.). Despite their many attributes, Berlinas continue to be both the under appreciated and undervalued 105 series model. Buy one to drive and enjoy but never think you'll pay too much or too little for the experience. Its all about owning a car that's in short supply and rarely in top condition.
 
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Alfa Jay Makro Super Moderator,

I make my living as an Auto Technician. I learned to work on Alfa Romeos at Stewart Sandeman Sr's Alfa Performance Connection in Orange County back in the 80;s. The only time we used a compression test guage was to see which cylinders of a V6 had no compression if it was towed in with a jumped timing belt. In my current position at a German Auto Dealership, I use my compression tester so infrequently, it sits in my toolbox at home.

Here's why I don't rely on compression tests, they can give false readings due to tester error. For example, if the fuel pump is not disabled and the cylinders get washed with fuel resulting in a low reading. Or if the throttle/butterfly valves are left closed and too much back pressure lowers the reading.

Most importantly Alfa engines tend to have carbon build up on the cylinder heads and backs of the valves. If even a tiny piece of carbon falls onto the face of the valve, you get a false reading.

A much more accurate test of engine health is a compression leak down test.

A simple road test in an Alfa is way more fun than a compression test any day. Back in those days when I drove my Alfa to and from work and drove customer cars before and after repairs it was very easy to tell the health of the engine by the way it pulled during acceleration and by how much it smoked under hard acceleration.

I stand by my comment and if I weren't too comfortable here at my desk, I'd go get one of my Tech school text books out of the garage and give you some more examples.

Best regards,

David Fish
Since I dragged you through the mud.. I'll take the heat. File this under new knowledge . My flex joint didn't last forever. It is split. Would that be covered under warranty since it is only 47 years old and a long way to go until forever?. I am sure you have way more knowledge than me and we live and die with these cars cared for by qualified technicians like you. It is just disheartening when anyone in the fraternity of technicians makes inaccurate statements and I lose confidence shelling out $120/hour when I know better.. The compression test is your take. The "if's" you cite are "if's" .. The test is not a sure bet but it is a glimpse and performed correctly is in a multi-step process that when put together give SOME information that in composite form is a clue what is going on in an engine if you are not there to witness the car... On the subject car I would have been more interested in how the Spica worked and how it had been serviced. We don't all have to agree.. but we do hang on every word a qualified tech says.. Last ly.. let me put it this way.. If an talented PH.d x 5 astronomer wrote a paper claiming to the reader the world is flat.. Do you think I would buy his books or pay to hear his lectures?
 

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The strong frame and nimble handling survived several accidents and saved people's lives.
You're right about that. I had a friend whose Berlina was hit head on. His wrist was hurt but he walked away. That was 40 years ago but his car was also rust free.
 

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When this arrived on BaT it immediately reminded me of a car I was offered but eventually walked away from a few years ago in Australia. That RHS sill, oh dear. Still, someone is happy so who are we to criticise.
 

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Discussion Starter #26 (Edited)
Its moving to a new home in South FL despite the negative remarks one BB member made here.
This was my brother's car and I've seen it in person.
It is not a rust bucket nor is it a money pit.
The car starts, runs and drives very well and has no mechanical problems.
A lot of the rust is simply surface rust that can be easily treated.
His career has kept him extremely busy so he has not had the time to devote to it and enjoy driving it.
Also, the horrendous traffic in the Atlanta area has made him wary to drive it, plus all the distracted drivers.
He works in the auto insurance industry so he sees it all the time.
This car has sat in his garage for several years and he decided to sell it.
He's actually an extremely knowledgeable Alfa owner and very competent mechanic.
Tough economic conditions with the virus probably kept the final price down a little bit.
Having driven Alfettas for decades, that flex disk looks just fine to me.
I drove one GT with split and cracked flex disks, but they held for a few years.
The one in my duetto looks about the same. Aged, but no cracks.
Just sayin'!
Thanks all!
 

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Clearly my remarks did not hinder the sale or it's movement to South Florida at a price that was satisfactory..I'm sure everyone is happy on your side.. Many miles of fun ahead, for all of you and the buyer.. I was transparent in my comments ..at least you know where they came from... I never questioned the flex joint, for the record .. That is peanuts in the grand scheme.. Everything will be just grand when your brother turns it over. Keep your powder dry.. it's going to be ok. .. Nice car ..
 

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As someone who knows the seller and lives in Atlanta, Id agree to his decision not to drive it around significantly in Atlanta. I rarely drive through Atlanta without seeing at least one major accident.

Ive driven my spider through Atlanta in 5pm traffic, I spent more time watching everyone else and reacting to them not seeing my tiny little car than I did anything else.

As far as the "all original", you either like it or you dont. Some cars need to be either driven till they either must be restored or scrapped, others are nice enough to preserve and try to maintain its current state. This car is obviously a bit polarizing as far as to which category it falls into. If I had taken the car home I would have replaced the suspension, original 40 something plus year old suspension is a big turn off to me LOL. I was the one who made the driveshaft donut remark, thats too cheap and disposable of a part to leave original, sorry.
The paint looked good to me, sure it needs a couple touch ups for rust prevention and what not.

But I think this Berlina is a bit better than it was given credit for here on the BB, though I haven't seen it in person.

At the end of the day when it comes to a car I did not buy....and do not have to pay the bills on....what the buyer does or decides to do with it isn't my problem. Im thankful to see this car is a survivor car
 

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Guys, these cars are simple and stout. Maybe I over simplified things, I get impatient with hand wringing over imaginary problems when a car is for sale on the internet. I liked this green car, it reminded me of my first Berlina:
Former Exclusive: Clean 1968 Alfa Romeo Berlina It had similar rust that worried people but cleaned up fine with some work on the rockers. There was no structural rust on the inner rockers once the rusty outside rocker was removed.

The new owner of this BaT car is way ahead buying it compared to another car I bought here on AlfaBB: Barn Find - 1969 1750 Berlina. I think I paid $3,500 plus $800 to have it trucked back to Oregon from Santa Barbara. You can see I bid with my heart on this one because it will take countless thousands to bring it back. The beauty for me was in the fact that no one had fiddled with it since 1986 and ugly as it is, it runs great! On the same front flex coupling that was on it when it was parked no less!

I bought another one that spent its life in the bay area and I still had to pay $1,200 plus a patch panel from Classic Alfa to replace the passenger front foot well.
1631524
 

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What a fun discussion. I just have to clean up the record as to what we should call our favorite driveshaft joint.

Giubo seems clearly to be the correct term. The inventor of this "giunto" was a man named, "Boschi." GIUnto + BOschi = Giubo.

Source = Wikipedia
 
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