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Not to mention how much lower the front end is sitting than the rear. Too low.
 

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I am not an expert on Alfa Paint but was that Silver offered at the time of production?
The 1750 Series 1 had Indigo grey and graphite grey. The add mentioned a grey but not which one.
Yes there was only Metallic light grey paint that was on the 1750 series 1. I hope they did not use Metallic Mid grey paint as that was only on the 1750 Series 2.
 

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Group 2 Motorsports has produced it's fare share of GTV, Spider and Giulia Super restorations and resto-mods over the past 18+ years (in addition to Porsche, BMW and many other one-off builds.) G2 became an Alfaholics dealer some years ago as well and since then we have sold only disparate suspension, exhaust and other pieces from their wonderful box of toys, until now. Group 2 was recently engaged to start a full Alfaholics GTA-R build, so we went to visit them in the UK last month.

Perhaps some of the build cost details will help shed light on the topic - as it relates to "full restorations" and period-correct rebuilds. Spoiler alert: a LARGE part of the cost is in-house labor and sublet labor - not parts (regardless of the ultimate goal; a period-correct restoration, or a resto-mod. build.)

Many of the parts that go into an original rebuild are no longer available for most of these cars, so as a restorer, the available choices sprout out like spider legs (no pun intended.) With an eye on quality, cost and availability, one reverts to reproduced pieces; some close to the original in specification, quality and function, some reproduced with increased performance in mind and some choices yet, purely aesthetic. Either way, ultimately, the cost of the parts holds a limited part in the overall cost picture of any restoration.

For example body sectioning and rust repair, the final metal work, body prep, final paint, clear-coat and paint finish; do you want to cut into the quarter panels and go rust hunting, or just treat the outer skins and call it good? We're doing a 1974 BMW 2002tii right now that saw the body so cut up that I didn't think it would ever go back together again! The rear quarters had to be sectioned at the rear fascia / tail-light valance, at the C-pillar, at the B-pillar and down by the rockers at the frame to get to the inner pans inside the rear wheel arches!!!

The floor pans were removed and replaced, the front valance / nose clip was cut off and replaced, the rocker sills were spot-weld drilled and replaced, the rear deck-lid was like swiss-cheese from 10 different speaker installations over the years - also replaced. The trunk pan and the door-hinge pans were cut out and replaced, the front fenders were replaced. The car was cut open so much, that we had to weld-in temporary structural reinforcement / interior support braces to hold the car together and to keep it from from caving in on itself while it was being cut apart! It looked like a 1"-tubing spider web roll cage in there and the entire car chassis was welded down onto a custom-made 4-wheel rolling frame dolly!

The car is back from paint and it looks amazing in it's original Sienna Braun Metallic paint, but we're in almost $40,000! Stripping the car of all trim - and I mean EVERYTHING (engine, transmission, differential, rolling gear, suspension, brakes, glass, interior - EVERYTHING came out), is a huge and labor-intensive undertaking. It is now a shell with nothing rubber, plastic, glass, aluminium or bolted-on steel attached to it! Preparing it for body and paint as described above, storing it, storing the parts, transporting it, the actual body preparation and paint as described and then the cost of sourcing all of the replacement parts is immense!

Even after the final paint and clear-coat, you have to decide - leave a little bit of that factory orange-peel texture, or sand it all down to glass (which is not considered a factory finish by the way, but if you are going for a "like glass" final finish, you're wet-sanding and polishing between every single guide-coat stage and then between the primer, paint and clear-coat finish steps until the cows come home.)

And NOW comes the re-assembly - finding and replacing all of the little broken, cracked and bent trim pieces - carefully reinstalling it all. It's a thing of patience and nightmares, but we love it. It's going to be a $150,000 car and probably only worth $50K in the eyes of many, so it becomes a labor of love for the owner - not a money-making proposition. The GTV restoration with $180K in it - I can totally see it then.

Here's another sobering thought; a full Alfaholics 290 GTA-R build is quoted today at $350,000 with a 4.5 year lead-time if you want the car built at Alfaholics in the UK and insist on that "Alfaholics GTA-R 290" chassis plate! Of that, $50,000 is the quote for a painted shell alone - quoted at 1000 hours. That's at "only" $50 per hour and a 1000 hours into the painted shell! I can see that on the aforementioned 2002tii build - we're easily at 600 hours and NO shop in Seattle works for 50 bucks an hour!

Our body guys do mainly Porsche builds and 3-600 hours is considered nothing on an air-cooled Porsche! That's how Singer and Guntherwerks can justify $500-600K and up (even a million dollars plus) for one of their builds! Recent quote from a local (world-renowned) Pebble-beach concours-winning paint and body shop: "...these days, it seems like they're all fifty / fifty-five grand for a painted shell - I don't care if it has a snake on the front, or a little horse..."

Believe me when I say that the cost of the parts is minor compared to the body preparation and final assembly and that's not to say that the parts are cheap. The good quality stuff is going to cost you. Everything that goes into an Alfaholics build is either a crazy custom reproduction piece (such as magnesium bell-housings and differential cases, or titanium lower control arms), or at least a top quality re-pop, or a rare-sourced OE part.

We also met with EB Spares, Classic Alfa, Auto Lusso, Jenvey, AT Power and several other vendors while we were over there and all of these companies take their quality control very seriously!
 

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Many of the parts that go into an original rebuild are no longer available for most of these cars, ... With an eye on quality, cost and availability, one reverts to reproduced pieces; some close to the original in specification, quality and function, some reproduced with increased performance in mind and some choices yet, purely aesthetic. Either way, ultimately, the cost of the parts holds a limited part in the overall cost picture of any restoration.
Restoration of cars is all about choices and we see this in the different approaches taken and sometimes its not to factory original standards. Some methods of using second hand parts cleaned up, builds using NOS parts, builds using reproduction parts may get you to factory original standards, while other builds using the wrong parts engine, interior etc will not. You have to be clear what you want in a 105 car.
Do you want a car close to or at factory original standards or do you want a hybrid car a modified version of the car with different power plants for street and another for race and another for replica race GTA list goes on and on...
After 50 years there as some NOS parts available, but expensive. It's the time that it will take to find them which could keep some one busy, either its you or you are paying for some one else to look (so parts costs and labour costs are related for NOS parts say.)

Some times you are not going to be able get car to the state/condition you want factory standard so you will have to make compromises to get yourself behind the wheel.

Now with more dedicated companies coordinating with the major parts suppliers doing 'turn key' 105 cars you can buy what you want. You just have to find the body shell or they have them in stock where you can choose.

I think the bench mark for valuations really comes back to a fully restored car to factory specifications. Every other variation from factory specifications is a hybrid car, a 2019 interpretation of a 1967 car. I'm not saying hybrid cars should not be built, only in that you can't use them to set the benchmark of valuation of factory originality.
I have valued hybrid cars not on how much was spent on them i.e. receipts but what would the cost be to reinstate the them back to standard factory condition in combination with on selling any of the nonstandard parts. For example a 1750 GTV 1969 with a non standard interior: value of non standard interior if sold? ~$500. Cost of correct interior installed ~$10,000. Cost to reinstate car to original = $10,000-$500=$9,500. Value of fully restored to factory specs 1750 GTV 1969= $X. I value the hybrid car at $X - $9,500.

I think these are exciting times for the 105 cars (for the remaining 105 cars) and the owners and potential owners and the repairers and parts suppliers where the cars are now in the spotlight and main stream be they factory standard or hybrid.
 

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I wasn't able to get that link to work, but found it at: http://catalogue.rmsothebys.com/books/zapo/#p=232 Click on the magnifying glass with the "+" sign inside it in order to make the text readable.

Yea, the catalog write-up says they spent $170K restoring it and that the work was done by Coachwerks of Victoria, B.C. RM Southebys calls the restoration price "staggering".

Estimated selling price is $125 - 150K, so even if you buy this GT at the high end of the range, you'll still be "saving" $20K (try convincing you wife of this logic!).
To add some perspective, the $170k in receipts is very likely $CND (shop being in Canada). In $USD that would be a bit less than $130k, currently. This might have something to do with the $125-150k estimate, which is surely in $USD. Still, the word "staggering" was well chosen.
 

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How people spend their money is their business. Glad we can look.

The windshield washer fluid bag needs a logo that says "Tudor" and some extra Italian stuff I can interpret into English with internet translator.

Brad "Guru" Fischer: Salespeople always call GT/GTV/Roundtail interiors leather, but the interiors were "skai" vinyl. Used car salespeople, geez.
Is the vinyl original weave available in leather now? Ben at Ralliround sold me some 1969 GTV seats and if the leather weave is available, that's what I will recover them in.

Good, honest, leather/vinyl/upholstery people are always busy. Any names and numbers on the West Coast or Texas would be appreciated. I know a few, but some that I know are cranky, or the nice ones working on yachts/boats right now.

When we had zero to no money, my spouse recovered my 1969 Spider seats, and nobody has come close to her work. But I am now too smart to ask her to do that, as I value my life.
TY
 

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I sold a running 1969 GTV with a rusty body for $2.5K several years ago. I knew that the body work would probably cost more than $20K and the car was not worth restoring.
 

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20k ... min 50k, if done properly
Pete
 

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Dr.G, Not sure what is available for the S1 Euro 1750 GTV seat material. I bought Skai black vinyl for my S2. That basket weave would be tough to duplicate in leather.
 

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As an aside, did anyone scroll through the other estimates? They all seem extremely high and unrealistic. Do they do that for the benefit of the owner? I don't get it and I'd be surprised if many of the cars advertised make it to the low estimate.
 

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I was using the price to repair and paint a 1967 GTV body and was told that the price was $25K. The body was at a shop that I have used many times but, I felt that the owner should have bought a better car. I sold my 1969 GTV because the car needed new rocker panels, front windshield panel replacement, rear window panel replacement, floor panel replacement and maybe trunk floor repair.
 

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What is happening I think as I mentioned before is demand has shifted upwards (be it for restoration or modified{hybrid} purposes) coupled with a close to vertical supply curves for these cars.
So in effect you have the following two groups competing for cars on the demand side those striving for factory original cars; the restorers {collectors} and the hybrid car builders, GTA/m evocation cars and racers.
On the supply side you have cars in various conditions. There are a wide range of conditions of cars available on the market, from closed to consumed by neglect so very needy cars requiring many new panels and mechanicals replaced, to running cars that have suffered poor repairs in the past like with angle iron for sills and square tubing for front cross members, not to mention chicken wire and filler. To sleeper cars missing original parts brought out of long term hibernation. Sourcing the missing correct mechanicals like engine, diff/brakes and gearbox can be costly in money and time.

What has caught a number of people out is their lack of knowledge with regards to the factory original interior, i.e. colours and materials for the 105 cars (for some hybrid cars this is not an issue). That's because no one has really bothered to check for the last 50 years, but now 'we' know!
 

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The cost of a restoration is directly proportional to the amount of money the shop thinks you have.
I'm not so sure.
I still think it's how well prepared you are as the owner and how well you know your car and understand what is needed and work as a team with the repairer. What was the comment by Gprocket, he just got off the phone about parts he needed then walked to the front door to pick them up.
 
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