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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi Frinds

I have a 76 Alfetta GTV that I'm trying to bring back to life.
The engine rotates, didn't tried starting it will do that after oil and oil filter change.
I had an issue with the gas throttle it was stuck, disasembeling some of the throttle rods discovered that what causing it is the spica.
it seems like the throttle switch on it is a little stuck and sticky.

attached are some pictures, this is a car that wasn't driven for 17 years.
the car had an excessive oil consumption but other ten that was ok.

Appreciate any advice.

btw im in Israel so no one here knows what spica is, im not looking to completely overall it at this point just to make it somehow working so i can start spin the motor.. a complete overall fot the spica will follow.

Thanks
Samuel
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Hi -

From the pictures, it looks like your Spica fuel injection pump is in rough shape. You probably won't get the engine started without having Wes Ingram rebuilding it for you. Go to his website, www.wesingram.com and order his book. You need to understand the Spica system. From the pictures it looks like you will also need a Thermostatic Actuator. Good luck.

- Drew
 

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Hello,

You have a couple of threads about your car here so I'll reply to this one.

The USA model Alfas in 1976 had low performance due to emissions and weight. The Alfetta GT was also prone to rust.

My first suggestion is to remove the huge bumpers and the bumper system shock absorbers. You can look for non USA chrome bumpers or not have any. This will reduce the weight by 100 kilos or so.

The 1976 USA models had a 4 into 1 exhaust manifold that was very restrictive. The rest of the world had a 4 into 2 into 1 exhaust system that was much better

The 1976 USA models also had a lower performance camshaft than the rest of the world.

I suggest you try any of the suggestions made so far to get your fuel injection pump to turn again and get the car running without spending any money on the engine. If oil use is too much try using a heavy weight oil like straight grade 40W.

I suggest you not invest in the overhaul of a 1976 USA spec engine. I think it would be better to use a later “Twin spark” engine as they make drastically more power than the older engines.

Alfetta GTs rust around the windshield and the rear glass. Check under the windshield trim. The later GTV6 model used a rubber gasket instead of the metal trimmed clips.

The 1976 air conditioner could not cool the car effectively given the large glass area. The later GTV6 had an option called tropical air conditioning that worked better. In your location I suggest you start with tinting the windows and them get an aftermarket air conditioning system like Vintage Air.

I loved my Alfetta GT and put 150K miles on it before it was worn out. Good Luck with your project

Tom
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Because of where you are, I would highly recommend taking the Spica injection pump off the car and do all the tests in the bench check guide here, Spica Technical Guides

It’s super cool the you still have the anti tamper cap on it, that’s great. As long as there is no fuel in the logic section, everything else can be dealt with by you, there.

Nice going, keep up the good work.
 

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One suggestion; while your car is a US one you are much closer and on a better time zone to European and UK suppliers. If you stick with the SPICA system then all your resources and help is in the US, however if you go the carb or twin-spark roUte there are an abundance of sources for both parts and advice in the EU or UK.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Thank you guys for all the answers, as this was a spica issue i thought here would be an appropriate place to post.

Twin spark is a great engine but replacing it sounds a little drastic at this point when i know nothing on my engine.

The car AC was removed (internal section was left), the 4 to1 outlet manifold was also removed and instead a European 4 to 2 was placed.
the car has a Jackobs coil and electronic ignition system.
Dont know anything about the camshaft inside.

A carb conversion will probably cost me around 1k$ then later i can change the camshaft to euro spec (need to understand first whats mine are)
a new twin spark engine with carb ~5k$ i can always go this route.

Lots to think of.
 

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it would be a good idea to get a compression test done b4 you put more time or money into it, especially as it uses oil. the spica may not be your biggest problem. how many km's on the car ?
 

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Make sure you have a good engine before going any further. It will save you a lot of headaches later on.
Looking at the lever arm, that is where it will be when it is cold. As the engine warms up, the arm distance closes up until it gets to .019 inches. Remove the two screws that hold the thermostatic actuator to the pump. Gently lift it from the pump and see if the end rod is sticking out. If it is flush then the actuator must be replaced. It is like an automatic choke on regular carb.
Does the pump turn easily?
You can remove the top caps to reveal the metering jets. These might be stuck in the bore they ride in. Some spray carb cleaner will free them up.
Drain out the old oil and use some carb cleaner in the back logic section to get the gunk out. Then refill with a half quart. Change the oil filter too. Most important to keep the pump in good order.
Pull the dipstick and see if it smells like gasoline. If that is true, the pistons in the pump are worn. The pump will have to be rebuilt. You could wind up with a sump full of gasoline.
Keep us posted on your progress, please.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hi Friends,

Squirrelman Will do a compression test as soon as if drain the oil and change the filter.
Velochdoc, that's great info. I understand how to check the TAC and would like to clean the logic section and the metering jets as you suggested, can this be done without removing the pump?, can you help explain which plate should I remove to accesses the above?.
Thank you.
 

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Yes, this can be done in the car, but getting access to the side plate that covers the logic section will require a short flat-tipped screwdriver. Other than that remove the altitude compensator 3 screws and go in that way. Be sure when putting this back together you put the lever arm (if there is one) in the N position.

The locking plates for the piston covers are removed with a 7mm wrench, and then using a thin box wrench you can remove the towers. Perhaps a very thin wall socket would be easier? There isn't a lot of room between the towers. There is a large spring under the tower. Then you can use a pair of thin pliers to check the metering jets to see if they are loose.
There is a drain plug on the bottom of the pump and I am not sure how you are going to get it loose if it is on the car.
Be sure to securely lock down the towers when tightening them so they do not leak.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Thank you Velochhdoc.

Quick update, took the old oil out, I was expecting a thick oil with sludge but what actually came out of the engine was a thin oil with black color.
???.
The oil fully synthetic was inserted 17years ago, does this sounds normal?. the qty that came out looks large, could that be an issue of oil gas leak from the spica to the oil pan?.
how can i check this?.

also opened the side panel of the spica logic section, not sure what to look for but it looks dry.
Should i put some engine oil inside?
the pump turns freely and the sticky throttle is now almost gone after me playing with it a bit

Thx,
Samuel.
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Not sure what that junk is on the right side. Put the cover back on, and through the top add about 2 cups of synthetic oil. Any extra will run back through the drain to the pan. You are doing nice work, keep us informed.
 

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Rust... I would use a regular oil as synthetic oil will find leaks and also normal 20 50 oil with zinc is just fine. Good luck
 
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