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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
Had this idea for removing these long bolts a while ago and today finally put it to the test.
We are talking the 200mm M10 bolts that run through the bottom of the rear dampers and lateral arms - the ones that tend to sieze solid.
The technique was simply as follows:
While the car was jacked up, rear wheel removed, I loosened the 17mm nut by quarter of a turn. I then white marked the positions of the nut, bolt and arms and both ends, to detect any movement.
When the car was lowered, due to suspension loadings, the rear most (adjustable) lateral arm rotated a little on the bolt - see the picture with the arrow. The arm at the front end didn't move and nor did the bolt.
Drove the car and a mile down the road, while gently braking to a halt, heard a 'clonk' from the rear. Haven't checked yet but assume the other arm rotated on the bolt or even the bolt itself. If this is the case it means the bolt is now 'only' gripped by the hub/damper and attempts to free it there will no longer have to include a combined battle against the two lateral arms.

Updates to follow.
 

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2020 Giulia TI,1988 Milano Gold Auto
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Wow that's a lot of rust!
 

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Ack. No wonder you might be having trouble with those bolts. Luckily, in my 91S, the bolts, and associated structures near by, are still just fine. The sloppy wet snow and rain we get just washes away any salt we might have on the roads in the winter.
 

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I hammered the hell out of mine to get them out, used a ton of pb blaster, then once out I needed to rethread both of them with my tap and die set. They are good now.
 

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Hope you used a ton of anti-seize goop on them. Would have been better to buy new ones and then use the goop.
 

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A very unpleasant job of pulling out this bolt, but I always succeeded. I don’t have my own pictures, how I did it, but there is a video how to do it on 156, the same design. WD-40, key and hammer. We create a key force on the bolt on the one hand, and on the other hand with a knocking hammer. Yes, maybe a long time,
but it always worked out. Slowly, back and forth. Trying to unscrew the bolt immediately - no need, it will break.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Great answers and will be taking it 'easy' when getting it out. Indeed a lot of rust - never been changed before. Have new bolts but don't intend to snap these ones. Will be interesting to see exactly where the bolt/arms have freed off. Was thinking the bolt must actually have shifted if the front arm has now moved - indicating maybe the whole thing has freed up. Will let you know when know.
 

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I removed the rust from the with a screwdriver and sanddpaper on the inside part, wd-15 for a few hours and with a hamer and air tool it's not that hard.
 

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If the bolts are that rusted/corroded, I don't think I would reuse them, as I'm not sure you could ever eliminate any of the potentially existing sources of corrosion completely. New ones with anti-seize would be the way to go unless you plan on pulling the old ones once in a while to check and recoat (I suspect that is an unlikely occurrence).
 

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If the bolts are that rusted/corroded, I don't think I would reuse them, as I'm not sure you could ever eliminate any of the potentially existing sources of corrosion completely. New ones with anti-seize would be the way to go unless you plan on pulling the old ones once in a while to check and recoat (I suspect that is an unlikely occurrence).
Not to mention the possibility of over torquing the bolt while trying to free it. Overtorque can permanently damage a bolt and it is very hard to check for this type of weakening. Usually the weakened spot is only found at the break.....
 

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Not so worried about structural damage to the capabilities of the bolts, just the likely reoccurrence of corrosion, thus requiring the same removal operations. Always nice to start off with clean noncorroded pieces. That's all.
 

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Not so worried about structural damage to the capabilities of the bolts, just the likely reoccurrence of corrosion, thus requiring the same removal operations. Always nice to start off with clean noncorroded pieces. That's all.
That I agree with, I also noticed some of the bolts seem to be coated and when wire wheeling that coating comes off. Doesn't help the situation.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Having loosened the nut a quarter turn on both of these bolts and seen the adjustable arm now moves relative to the bolt, can see they are not 'frozen' where the bolt passes through the hub/strut and fixed length arm.
Question: is the metal inner of the fixed length arm bush likely to be seized to the bolt or is the bolt likely to be just siezed to the caliper/strut? My concern is if the metal inner of the fixed length arm bush is siezed to the bolt then forcing the bolt to turn could rip up the bush. Have no idea how to replace the bush if it does. Am I just over thinking this, for a change....?
 

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Overthinking it. Just work it out with a mallet and some finesse. Like I said worst case you may need a tap and die for the threads.
 
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Discussion Starter #16
Overthinking it. Just work it out with a mallet and some finesse. Like I said worst case you may need a tap and die for the threads.
Thanks. Have replacement bolts so not worried about damaging that side of things. Still wondering about how to replace the bushes on the fixed length arms. Must be possible, in theory.
 

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Thanks. Have replacement bolts so not worried about damaging that side of things. Still wondering about how to replace the bushes on the fixed length arms. Must be possible, in theory.
So the bushings don't exist anywhere that i looked. We were hoping the Bushings from the Lolipops on the other side would fit, but they are too small.
@Spitfire was looking into some Honda bushings that he DID get to fit. I'd get in touch with him, if you want to do new bushings.

I ended up finding a brand new set of arms in the UK, and they were literally the only ones I could find anywhere.
 

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So the bushings don't exist anywhere that i looked.
I already wrote about this. I repeat. I made a bushings from: HONDA CR-V; HONDA Civic; HONDA Integra
But since these bushings are not separate, one must look for polyurethane.





Arm numbers where these bushings are used:
52390-SH3-000 ; 52390-SH3-010 ; 52390-SH3-020 ; 52390-SR3-000 ; 52395-SH3-004 ; 52395-SH3-005 ; 52395-SK7-004 ; 52395-SR0-A01 ; 52400-SH3-000 ; 52400-SH3-010 ; 52400-SH3-020 ; 52400-SH3-030 ; 52400-SH3-A00 ; 52400-SJ4-000 ; 52400-SK7-010 ; 52400-SR3-000 ; 52400-SR3-A00 ; 53393-SK7-004 ;
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Hi Evgeny 164,

great find, thank you.
Just to be clear, did you obtain original Honda bushes and convert them to poly or did you start with poly Honda bushes? Thanks.
 

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Hi Evgeny 164,

great find, thank you.
Just to be clear, did you obtain original Honda bushes and convert them to poly or did you start with poly Honda bushes? Thanks.
Original Honda bushes - they are not on sale. There are only Chinese. For Japanese cars, only the whole arm (in our case) can be original. Therefore, I immediately used polyurethane.
 
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