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Discussion Starter #1
All,
I've got a '67 duetto with a 1600 that could use some more pep.
I've acquired a series one 1750 engine, transmission, euro manifold and Weber 40 dcoe 32's.
The 1750 engine sat indoors for over 15 or 20 years but looks to be in very good condition.
Aside from that, the history on it is unknown.
The car isn't perfect and is not all original and it definitely could use the engine and transmission seals renewed!
My garage floor is a borderline hazmat site.
It's a daily driver when the weather cooperates.
It has a few dings and imperfections and it had some rust that was cut out and new steel welded in.
I'm planning on having the 1750 and transmission refreshed and drop it in the car.
The '68 and '69 duettos had 1750's so it would be somewhat period correct.
Thoughts and comments.
Thanks.
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Super Moderator
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10,401 Posts
Sure, go for it! It's a pure bolt-in, so no harm done. Just hang on to your original 1600; perhaps the next owner will want to restore the car to its original state. But in the meantime, you'll enjoy the increased torque of the 1750.
 

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Premium Member
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2,569 Posts
If you plan to use the 67 setup something will need to be done about the clutch as 1750 used hydraulic system while 1600 used mechanical. Easy to do by swapping the 1750 flywheel for a 1600, used the 1600 open bellhousing and the 2 bolt starter. Or you swap out the 1600 pedal assembly for a hydraulic unit from a USA 69 Spider
Cheers, Jon
 

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Richard Jemison
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7,240 Posts
The 1750 clutch is far stronger than the 1600 one. Just use the 1600 bell housing on the transmission and get the adaptor sold by Centerline to use the 1750/2 liter release bearing in it. You will need to swap the 1600 105 tooth ring gear to the 1750 flywheel. It has the same ID as the 1750 but the OD of the 1750 will not fit in the 1600 bell housing.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
This engine has the early 1750 Euro cams.
105020320001 with 9.5 MM lift.
What can I expect as far as power, idling, mileage and general driveability characteristics with these when paired with Webers?
 

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Us -48 cams at least. Better: build a head with higher lift cams and make some torque and power. Recent cam developments have been excellent. Use a little more compression in the build too.


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I don't think so a 67 never had a 1750 engine, so not period correct.
I would not bother to go down the 1750 engine swap / flywheel changes path as it would make your car heavier
Really going for 150cc increase and all that expense, do your own calculations as to price per cc increase.
It was a 1980's/90's cultural trend that people still fall for in 2020.
When it comes time to sell(you or your relatives) will have a wider potential buyer group with it's original 1600 engine repaired and running than the 1750 engine.
Body work can be repaired, finding a misplaced 1600 engine for your car can be quite a difficult task that can take years for your relatives.
 

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This engine has the early 1750 Euro cams.
105020320001 with 9.5 MM lift.
What can I expect as far as power, idling, mileage and general driveability characteristics with these when paired with Webers?
To the best of my knowledge, that is not an early "Euro" camshaft. I believe it is a typical, USA, Spica era cam. The short answer to your question is, "not much." Agree with the above advice, put in a set of modern cams designed to work together. In my experience, better, bigger, correctly paired, modern camshafts provide excellent low speed driveability and a very civilized idle.
 

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You are right. However, "Euro" typically refers to the 1054803200xx camshafts that have a little more lift and produce an improvement in engine performance compared to the 1052003200xx cams that we got in the US cars. You originally said you were looking for more power and you asked about the characteristics of the cams in your 1750 motor. The answer hasn't changed. If you want to use those stock cams, please do. They'll likely work fine. Just don't expect anything special from them.
 

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Richard Jemison
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7,240 Posts
The 1750 will be a big improvement, but be aware that it`s head is the same as a 1600 and the small valves and seats are a power limiting problem. You should have the inside diameter of the seats opened, use larger oversize valves on the intake .
Engines weigh the same so weight is no issue. Neither is being "period correct". Engines are visually the same.
 

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I agree with those who recommend keeping your Duetto stock. I just did a complete rebuild on my 1966 Duetto engine. I got all the engine parts from Spruell Motorsports: Pistons, liners, pumps, seals, chains and bearings. The head was built by Jon Norman with new valves, springs, cams and manifold ported to head. It runs every bit as strong as my good friends euro 1750. The stock euro cam specification will give you good results.

Mark
 

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I put a 1750 in my '67 Duetto a few years back and it made a huge difference in drivability. Most notably the added torque allows me to make a turn without always having to downshift (and double clutch) to 2nd. That said, a 1600 is still fun to drive. In my case, the 1600 block that was in there was from an earlier TI and had a 1750 head on it so I didn't feel too bad about altering it.
 

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Drop in the 1750 and enjoy it, great revs, better torque and simple to do short of updating the ring gear etc
You can build the 1600 up and match it for power etc with oversize liners, better cams, porting etc, but that gets expensive and may be better left for another day
 

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Harmon
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48 Posts
All,
I've got a '67 duetto with a 1600 that could use some more pep.
I've acquired a series one 1750 engine, transmission, euro manifold and Weber 40 dcoe 32's.
The 1750 engine sat indoors for over 15 or 20 years but looks to be in very good condition.
Aside from that, the history on it is unknown.
The car isn't perfect and is not all original and it definitely could use the engine and transmission seals renewed!
My garage floor is a borderline hazmat site.
It's a daily driver when the weather cooperates.
It has a few dings and imperfections and it had some rust that was cut out and new steel welded in.
I'm planning on having the 1750 and transmission refreshed and drop it in the car.
The '68 and '69 duettos had 1750's so it would be somewhat period correct.
Thoughts and comments.
Thanks.
View attachment 1613643
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When I bought my 64 Giulia Normale in 1985 I wanted more power and planned on sliding in a 1750 with fuel injection. All of the western gurus Glenn Oliveria, Jon Norman, Stewart Sandeman, et al, dissuaded me. "Stick with the high revving 1600, add twin DCOE 40s, headers, 123 distributor, mid cams (so I could idle comfortably at an intersection), oversize sodium valves, port and relieve it and lighten the fly wheel. Glenn built it and I found I needed better brakes so installed a 105 rear end with discs (and lower ratio). 277,000 miles and seven cross country trips ooo gurus putttinen
All,
I've got a '67 duetto with a 1600 that could use some more pep.
I've acquired a series one 1750 engine, transmission, euro manifold and Weber 40 dcoe 32's.
The 1750 engine sat indoors for over 15 or 20 years but looks to be in very good condition.
Aside from that, the history on it is unknown.
The car isn't perfect and is not all original and it definitely could use the engine and transmission seals renewed!
My garage floor is a borderline hazmat site.
It's a daily driver when the weather cooperates.
It has a few dings and imperfections and it had some rust that was cut out and new steel welded in.
I'm planning on having the 1750 and transmission refreshed and drop it in the car.
The '68 and '69 duettos had 1750's so it would be somewhat period correct.
Thoughts and comments.
Thanks.
View attachment 1613643
View attachment 1613644
View attachment 1613645
View attachment 1613646
When I bought my barn find '64 Giulia spider Normale in 1985 I knew it need more power. I anticipated sliding in an injected 1750 and lining lining it out to 2000. But all the western gurus, Glenn Oliveria, Jon Norman, Stewart Sandeman, et. al. dissuaded me. "Stick with the high revving 1600, add twin DCOE 40s, new pistons, over size sodium valves, mid cams (so I could still idle at an intersection), light weight fly wheel, headers, 123 ignition and port and relieve it. Glenn built it, I found I needed more stopping power so Conrad Stevenson installed a 105 rear end with disc brakes and a lower gear ratio. 277.000 miles later, including seven cross country trips, an engine refresh and carb rebuild by Mark Dubovich in 2013 and tranny rebuild by Mike Besic last year, she's still screaming. And I still have the original engine in her.
Harmon
Sarasota, FL
 
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