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Thanks Rich,

Appreciate the input again! Well my 0.001 feeler gauge didn't slip through anywhere.. so maybe I can spare a trip to the machinist.
Do yourself a favor and let the machine shop surface the head. It doesn't cost that much.
 

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Thanks Rich,

Appreciate the input again! Well my 0.001 feeler gauge didn't slip through anywhere.. so maybe I can spare a trip to the machinist.

Do yourself a favor and let the machine shop surface the head. It doesn't cost that much.

I wouldn't argue with the master!
 

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Here is what I insist on and do to be thorough, which may help you or the new owner in the long run.
a. Pull the engine out.
b. Completely strip the engine down
c. If the liners are in good condition you can either clean the liners using a mechanical method on the outside then soak them in a molasses solution to get rid the remaining rust build up on the outside of the liner. Or buy new pistons and liners as checking / cleaning cost can escalate if you are paying some one else to do it, so a waste of money, false economy in the long run.

The real issue I think for you is the crusted on rust stains on the inside alloy and water pump area of the block and the head studs.

Soaking the block in molasses solution may get rid of the rust stains, I have tried it with moderate success.

I have seen blocks placed in acid to clean them. Acids used in cleaning your alloy block not only cleans the block, but the acid eats away at your precious alloy block (especially at the liner sealing surfaces and where the crank sits/caps) and the steel head studs at the same time! Try and avoid this acid method if possible.

Cheers Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #44
Thanks Steve. I got the top of the studs nice and clean.. but yep, there's definitely something sinister going on down below!! Thanks for sharing from your experience. This is the first time I've really got deep under the hood of my car so really appreciate all the comments.

And thanks Rich and Jim... you guys have been regular contributors on my journey here!! Appreciate all the input.

To the Aussie audience, any well known machine shops in Sydney who can look after my head? I searched the forums but nothing jumped out. Otherwise I'll sniff around myself and see what I can find.
 

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Shaving the head to get rid of pitting and rust staining in the water jacket area is just wrong!!
As said, yours are very slight and you dont want to take so much material off the head....The solution is to run the right anti-freeze with distilled water!!
 

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Agree, the head only matters around the combustion chamber, oil passages and outer edge ... the rest could be pitted to hell and back, doesn't matter.
Pete
 

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I wasn't suggesting shaving the head until the pitting is gone. Just a light shave to make sure its flat. Which would also clean up the unpitied areas.

Unless someone has spent a nice chunk of change for a real machinist straight edge. Your really just guessing whether the head is straight or not.
 

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Discussion Starter #48
Thanks guys - I really appreciate and respect all the input. Especially given this is the first time I've used a wrench in anger..!! So totally appreciate everyone's time for sharing their experiences.

Unfortunately I only get to work on my car on the weekends at the moment, so until next weekend, I figure who doesn't love an image of a cleanish looking block surface in the interim! Only took about 5 hours with countless replacements of scotch brite pads and a lot of elbow grease... and not finished yet!! ;) Respect for those who have done this more than once!!!

On a related note, is there an easy source for roll pins.. they sounded like a sensible option from the discussions.

I almost feel a need to change the subject.. it's certainly morphed into a rich variety of engine related topics!!
 

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A couple of points:

1. I'll be the first, but you really need to be holding down your piston liners, as if they move you are into a much bigger job ...

2. The cleaning of the top of the block; like the head the most important thing is that it is FLAT, which is why I get nervous when people clean it with sand paper, or scotch brite type things, as you may unintentionally make low spots. Mechanics use scrapers to scrape the surface clean, they do not sand for this reason. It is unlikely that scotch brite would do damage, but with a sanding process the softest metal gets removed not the top most ...

Best
Pete
 

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Discussion Starter #50
A couple of points:

1. I'll be the first, but you really need to be holding down your piston liners, as if they move you are into a much bigger job ...

2. The cleaning of the top of the block; like the head the most important thing is that it is FLAT, which is why I get nervous when people clean it with sand paper, or scotch brite type things, as you may unintentionally make low spots. Mechanics use scrapers to scrape the surface clean, they do not sand for this reason. It is unlikely that scotch brite would do damage, but with a sanding process the softest metal gets removed not the top most ...

Best
Pete
Thanks Pete! I'm definitely trying to do the right things so appreciate the collective wisdom here. Obviously I avoided a metal scraper, but my cleaning attempts with a plastic scraper I found to be basically ineffective! Hopefully no damage done....

And yes, I know about the piston liners. When I rehearsed the steps in my mind the head was going to be whipped off and on again before I knew it! Obviously that hasn't been the case... the reality slightly different... but still been a super fun project so far. I'll get onto the pipe and washers this weekend! ;)

Thanks for your input.
 

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Mechanics use metal scrapers, even razor blades, they don't sand for the reasons I've already mentioned.

Best
Pete
 

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Just one more thought....
I usually place a golf tee into each of the 6 oil passages feeding the cams......
Lots of nasty bits could fall in there and are hard to clean out at this point.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
Thanks guys. Anyway, couple of updates from the weekend for those interested. Not a lot done today, but interesting enough for me!

Firstly, thanks to those who filled me in about the hot/cold air intake system. After fondling my air box, I actually discovered what was spoken of - the ability to divert the intake system. With the infamous hose connected, one could divert warm air into the intake. Anyway, I've removed the plate from the engine mount and the block, but interesting to understand how this all worked! Picture attached with the diversion in place to pull warm air from the block.
 

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Discussion Starter #54
The other constructive thing I did today was install the pipes and washers to keep the sleeves at bay, just incase...

It also meant I could take some time to clean the pistons, very satisfying.

The piston in cylinder #3 looked like it had taken a bit of a beating compared to the others, not sure what that means, nor if the picture does it justice.

However the good news is they all look much better!! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #55
And finally the other interesting thing I discovered as I considered my engine reconstruction was with the head gasket. I was lining up my new Reinz gasket with the block and noticed at the rear, the block has 3 ports, whereas the gasket only has two.

My research lead me to the following thread - https://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/spider-105-115-series-1966-1994/147012-head-gasket-replacement-gasket-sealant-2.html

Reading was thoroughly interesting given the recommendation of supplementing the rear of the gasket with some sealant to seal of the oil drainage. A fortuitous find for me...

Unless it's already included, would be worth updating the following - https://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/spider-105-115-series-1966-1994/173140-head-gasket-replacement-dummies-procedure.html

Certainly something I read more than once before I tackled this operation!!
 

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Discussion Starter #56
Found some more time to work on this... certainly a lot more enjoyable putting things back together, especially when they are clean!

With everything out, replaced the trickier engine mount. Can see the old one was sagging a bit!!

Installed a new starter motor. Then went to install the oil sender. Unfortunately new starter motor was blocking. :( Uninstalled starter motor. Installed oil sender. Re-installed starter motor. There's basically zero gap between the sender and the starter motor. Dad was suggesting installing a right angle attachment to relocate the sender...?? The original starter tended to lean more away from the sender...

Anyway, also replaced the fuel hoses today. Some good progress.

Now I also installed a new water pump, but one from a 2000. Although removing the bottom two studs allowed me to remove the 1750 water pump, there wasn't enough clearance to install the 2000 water pump (given the crankshaft pulley in place). I removed the next set of studs and that provided enough room... as long as the tachometer housing wasn't installed!! Got there in the end, now with 4 M6 bolts and the remaining studs/nuts.

Now I know I'm mixing and matching, but I'm guessing the 2000 water pump must be slightly different as my pointer is a fair bit off the 'P' mark. I was planning to re-mark my TDC point, and figure I can adjust the pulley next time it's off to better re-align 'P' with my pointer?? (there's only so far I can bend the pointer!) Assuming that's the right approach...
 

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that cranckshaft puly doesnt look like the normal 105, its looks more to an Alfetta one with an armonic balancer, the marks could be at a diferent angle like the Alfetta waterpump had the pointer for the puly on a slightly diferent place on the waterpump
 

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Discussion Starter #58
Turns out the starter motor had two positions... adjusted and much more room now. Hopefully that's the last time pulling the starter motor for a while!! ;)

Pulled out the spray paint today too... well that feels good!! At least until I scratch them installing!! ;)
 

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Hi all,
This all is looking great and clean!
To complete about abrasive cleaning if I may.
In my opinion, Pete is more than correct in post 49 about the use of any abrasive tool on surfaces that have to be completely flat. In this case , what’s done is done and probably no harm was done here but maybe it is good that this was brought up for discussion.

To prevent for scratches and deformations, and if you don’t prefer to go the chemical way, I would agree that the best tool to clean the surfaces, not only this one but also surfaces between engine block and oil sump, waterpumps etc… is a flat and flexibel scraper and even more specific to be used in a low angle regarding to the surface. Not to be used are hard metal tools like shisels , files, screwdrivers or sawblades.
Sorry, I don’t know the correct English word for the tool I would recommend, that’s why I’ve included a picture of it. I know, this is not my best example but it was the only one I could find directly for making the picture!

I remember also my father even forbidding his students garagist to use abrasive paper or a file to clean the oxidated little surfaces of the contact pounts of the distributor but instead use such a flexibel scraper. Anyone can imagine the moon landscape that stays behind when using hard materials and can imagine the electric influence of even 1 remaining ‘moonstone’ between the points after polishing!

For a first inspection of a surface, we often used the light of a torch behind a square that is placed on that surface in all kind of directions.

About yes or no having shaved the surface of the heads, I think it’s all about confidence between you and the machinist. Ask him to clean and check first the surface and report honestly to you what he found without starting shaving yet. Afterwards you can discuss with him what he should do. Essential is that he should know from the beginning how precious this part is to you and that shaving 2 tenth of a millimeter if only one tenth is required is shortening the life of your cylinder head.
Much to often machinists will shave immediately thinking that the Alfa heads still grow up into heaven and can be replaced by new ones with one click on the Net as is done with modern cars.
All this is only my vision of course, other thoughts or corrections are appreciated.
Rgds,
Thierry
 

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Discussion Starter #60
Hey all,

Had a weekend off previously, so progress slowed. However had a big weekend just passed. Certainly very satisfying reinstalling new and/or clean parts!!! Got the head back on, exhaust manifold, alternator, fan belt and new fan. Also got the freshly painted radiator installed with the new supporting rubbers along with the intake manifold. With the head back on, I was also able to test the new starter motor... did what it needed to do!!

All that's left is installing the carbs next weekend, then I think I'm ready to pour some oil into the engine and see what happens!!

One question though from my experience on the weekend... the new fan belt was filthy tight to install. Even with the alternator in it's most inbound position. Obviously the old belt had some wear, however I was surprised how tight the new belt was, I expected to be able to slip it on. As a result, the alternator did not have to move too far outward on it's bracket to create the necessary tension. However it now means the adjusting bolt is ever so close to the water pump whereas previously it was just off the water pump. For full disclosure, I have switched to a 2000 water pump instead of the stock 1750 pump. Perhaps there are some intricate differences at play here... I have already encountered one of them when installing the pump. Anyway, some photos attached of progress and the location of the alternator adjusting bolt.

And perhaps a question to the Australian contingent... I searched the forum last night enjoying all the discussion on oil selection. There was a lot of chat about Castrol GTX 20w50 along with a lot of chat about zddp.. I notice Penrite do an oil for classic cars, however keen to get something suitable that I can source easily from my local auto store. Perhaps the Aussies can let me know what's readily and easily available that suits?!?

Thanks again to all who have taken a moment to read my ramblings on what is my first foray into getting my hands dirty under the hood.

Cheers.
 

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