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Discussion Starter #21
Gents,

I know I'm getting ahead of myself given I haven't even got the head off yet... but I'm waiting for a "head removal tool" to arrive so it's giving me time to think ahead.. possibly to the area I'm "nervous" about... so thanks for the input above, really helpful for when the time comes.

Now I have been doing some of my own reading to try and be somewhat informed!! However I'm still confused as to "Do not turn the crankshaft when the timing chain is disconnected" (I'm reading the workshop manual atm).

I appreciate the lower timing marks are not visible, however I'm not removing that chain. I figured I could rotate the crankshaft as much as I like, on the proviso that when it comes to reinstalling the camshafts I put the crankshaft back to where it needs to be.

Isn't the head removal with the cylinder rope technique challenging this already?

I understand that when the head is off, then sure, the crankshaft rotation could be a bad idea for the sleeves... but aside from that, am I missing something? Sorry if it's obvious, not quite seeing it. Assuming the lower sprockets are correctly positioned, as long as we're back to TDC for camshaft alignment I figured we'd be good to go?

I am also reading Braden's books on the subject too!! :)
 

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The only reason I can think of to not turn the crank with the chain disconnected is the chain can get jammed up around the timing gear sprocket in the timing cover.

There are no timing marks on the chain gear in the timing cover and also none on the sprocket on the crank. The only timing marks are the ones on the crank pulley and the pointer right above the pulley.

As long as the crank is set on number 1 top dead center when you go to put the chain on the cam your good.

You defiantly do not want to turn the crank unless you have the hold down tools on the liners. You can use sockets, big washers, pipe etc to make them.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Yet again, I thought my head would be the exception. I was wrong. That was not easy! Much easier in my imagination!! Ended up taking about 4 hours to get the head removed. It was tight!! The head removal tool proved invaluable. It was definitely needed even after the initial head/block formed a gap. Had to do all sorts of things with little sockets sitting on the studs to keep using the tool to keep raising the head. Wow. The rear studs were the worst. Certainly an issue when the penetrating oil was pooling at the top!!

After much frustration we ended up knocking the head back down so we could just work the up/down on the studs for a while. Once we saw the penetration oil running down the rear studs we figured we were making progress!! Seemed to be the key variable for us. Slow going, but we got there eventually.

According to my records, the head was last off 20 years ago. Anyway, with the head removed it was obvious where my issue was... clear deterioration in a section of the gasket.

Time to get on with the cleaning... well, maybe tomorrow's job!
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Another action shot! ;)

We knocked it backed down from here as we weren't making progress. But as mentioned, with a bit of up/down jingle jangle we got there....

Will be better prepared for next time!!
 

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Good work!

Assuming you are removing the liners, take a close look at the head studs at the bottom of the block. If they are badly corroded (I've found them less than half their original diameter) you may need to replace them. This is not an easy, DIY process. The studs will break off and the ends need to be EDM'd out of the block. Not many shops can or are willing to tackle that work. I have a guy locally that does mine and I've used a guy near Chicago that I'd trust. It's about a $500 job.

Hopefully you're ok but if you had that much corrosion at the head you certainly don't want to assume.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Thanks Rich.. appreciate the words of wisdom! I hadn't planned on removing the liners or any other block work to be honest! I thought I was now at the half way point, on the way back to putting things back together!!! ;)

However certainly respect the advice of those who have more experience than me, so will look into it.

Thanks again for all the input as I journey along here, much appreciated. Certainly been fun and educational!!
 

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Discussion Starter #28
As suggested, also removed the starter motor... what's the preferred option here? Try and refurbish the existing unit? Or it's just simpler to install a new one? Any better than others? I did see a couple of interesting threads on this subject about noisy new starter motors...
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Re "Heat shield"...
If what you are referring to is the rust-coloured, tubular-ended piece shown in post #7, it receives one end of an air intake hose, the other end of which goes to the second air cleaner inlet hole in the nose of your tubular canister. At some time that hose has fallen or been taken off.
If you do in fact have that two-inlet canister, the second hole is for a 'winter' setting, drawing warmer air through that hose from down near the motor, opened/closed with a lever-operated flap.
Now, I always thought cold air = good, warm air = bad, with engines, but I guess there comes a point where too cold = more bad. I don't know how cold that is.
Does someone out there have an original owners manual with relevant info? Be interesting to see what it said.
My internet research didn't reveal too much about this warm air intake unfortunately, although very interesting! Anyway, I tried to remove it however it seemed a little too tightly intertwined with the engine mount. A more unconventional approach managed to remove most of the shield... ;)

Helpful for my current cleaning project!
 

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Discussion Starter #32
I know.. outrageous!! ;)

Anyway, a most satisfying outcome... the cleanest the engine and engine bay has been in a long time. Good enough job for an inplace clean.

Also had a little bit of project creep.... took the water pump off too...! Thanks to all those who paved the way previously with the double bolt trick on the lower studs. Ironically the workshop manual says undo all the bolts and remove... if only it was that simple!! Also thinking about replacing the fuel lines to and from the fuel pump. Had a good read all about clamps in another thread, particularly the Copiglia fuel line clamps. Can I just replace with jubilee clamps?

And... now also thinking about replacing that engine mount whilst I'm here! So much for just a head gasket change.. ;)

Oh, any words of wisdom for cleaning the head and block surfaces (aside from elbow grease!)?? :)
 

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Crikey, that’s pretty clean for a in place job, well done!

Let me get the this right, you’re now asking for project creep ideas ? ;)
Ha!

0. Absolutely, engine mounts, both sides while you can... standard is fine
1. Absolutely replace all fuel hoses, yes jubilee clamps are fine
2. Inspect the vacuum (brake booster) and heater hoses while you have easy access
3. Send your manifold out for some pretty ceramic coating
4. Send the alternator out to the same people to rebuild your stater

How much of your money am I allowed to spend??

5. I can see the clutch slave cylinder, how old is the hose?
6. Any evidence of the ground strap from the gearbox to body?
7. Install 123Ignition (Bluetooth)
8. Drop the sump and ship the oil pump to local alfisti for rebuild
9. Whip out the liners/pistons, just replace with Spruell HC stuff
10. Radiator....
11. Replace the oil pressure sender (above starter, below carbs), it will be a pain later, there are two types, rookie trap
12. I could do this all day

Where’s your engine number ... or did you polish it off?


13. Roll pin kit for head gasket oil control
 

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Crikey, that’s pretty clean for a in place job, well done!

Let me get the this right, you’re now asking for project creep ideas ? ;)
Ha!

0. Absolutely, engine mounts, both sides while you can... standard is fine
1. Absolutely replace all fuel hoses, yes jubilee clamps are fine
2. Inspect the vacuum (brake booster) and heater hoses while you have easy access
3. Send your manifold out for some pretty ceramic coating
4. Send the alternator out to the same people to rebuild your stater

How much of your money am I allowed to spend??

5. I can see the clutch slave cylinder, how old is the hose?
6. Any evidence of the ground strap from the gearbox to body?
7. Install 123Ignition (Bluetooth)
8. Drop the sump and ship the oil pump to local alfisti for rebuild
9. Whip out the liners/pistons, just replace with Spruell HC stuff
10. Radiator....
11. Replace the oil pressure sender (above starter, below carbs), it will be a pain later, there are two types, rookie trap
12. I could do this all day

Where’s your engine number ... or did you polish it off?


13. Roll pin kit for head gasket oil control
LOL LOL LOL :laugh2::laugh2::laugh2::laugh2::laugh2: caught another one
 

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Ha!

ajt_watching needs to change his user name to ajt_now_caught
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Ha!

ajt_watching needs to change his user name to ajt_now_caught
I love this stuff! ;)

Appreciate all the ideas!

Well so far my "simple" head gasket change has now morphed into:

* new water pump
* new starter motor
* new cooling and vacuum hoses
* new fuel lines in the engine bay
* aluminum carb mounts
* engine mounts

The 123 is definitely on my wish list but that'll have to come later! Earth strap is good, and I'll be getting the radiator checked.

I think with all that, I'll probably have to tap out until I've saved up for the next round of improvements!!
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Next weekend update.... cleaning all these gasket surfaces is a pain in the butt!!

Anyway, do I need to be concerned about pitting on the head where the studs come through?

Some images attached below.
 

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That's not serious pitting from what I can see. I've seen deep craters that extend to the liner. Those I'd worry about...

Regarding dizzys: as much as I love 123s and use them whenever budget allows, for a stock motor a pertronix module is a smart alternative. As long as your dizzy has good advance weights and bearings you'll get 90% of the 123 for under $100...
 

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Discussion Starter #40
Thanks Rich,

Appreciate the input again! Well my 0.001 feeler gauge didn't slip through anywhere.. so maybe I can spare a trip to the machinist.

Thanks also for the tip on the pertronix module. I'll check that out too!!
 
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