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Discussion Starter #1
I am finally working on my engine. Great fun but very messy. The cylinder head and all of the bits are all mostly cleaned up and I am now ready for installing new valve guides. yeehaa.

I took a break from the head today and I took apart the water pump. The circlip was missing - probably rusted all out. I need to clean/change the spindle seal, but I am afraid on how to take it off. Could someone please tell me how to get the impeller of of the shaft without breaking it?

Also, should the seal be tight around the shaft or tight to the impeller - or both?

Doug
 

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The 2000 Shop Manual does not give specific instructions for how to separate the impeller from the shaft, but 2 tool bulletins that also apply to 102 cars show how to do remove the impeller and how to install the seal:
 

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Doug, I just did this last year and I made a tool similar to the one shown in Ruedi's post above. Since I was going to replace the seal, I cut it in half and removed it to allow more room. I then used a hydraulic press to remove the impeller. I would warn against trying to remove the impeller with a bearing puller, as the force needed in my case was very high and surely would have broken it if pulling on the outer diameter.
Larry
 

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By the way, the seal is the same as on some other Alfas and also the same as a John Deere tractor seal and can be had for less than ten dollars. If you need the John Deere part number, I posted it in this forum several years ago and you might find it by searching the archives, but if you can't find it, I may be able to find it, so let me know. The carbon face of the seal presses against the hub of the impeller, if I remember right and may also have a secondary seal to grip the shaft to stop any leakage from reaching the bearing before it can drain from the weep hole.
Larry Bono
 

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FYI, the John Deere parts number for 2600 water pumps Larry mentioned can be found in this thread.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Great information! Thanks Larry and Ruedi. I shall do the same by cutting the seal off to give me more room.

Doug
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I bought the gasket from the other post. I will wait to see that before I take the other one off - I hope I dont break the impeler when I try pressing it out!

Doug
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I got the tractor seal with the number from other post - and it is the right size. I measured many parameters before I removed the seal and all were ok. Great price too - it cost me $15 including shipping versus 40-50 from Alfa sites! Thanks for that tip.

I am still unsure about the inner flange I indicated in the red circle. I dont find that in any of the rebuild kits either from OKP or classic. Does any have information on that flange?

Doug
 

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Doug, that little tube with the cone-shaped end is a water slinger. If re-using the bearing and shaft, you should be able to re-use it. The rebuild kit I used for my 2600 had a slightly larger shaft diameter (about .002" I think). I bought the kit many years ago and did not realize this difference until I had my pump apart. Being stubborn, I decided to use it anyway, which necessitated honing the impeller bore and stretching the water slinger bore, which is brass if I remember correctly. I did this with tools I have that are meant for repairing flute (the musical instrument) tenons.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hi Larry,

I do not have this part at all. That and the circlip were not in the pump. What is the part made of? I could have one made.


Doug
 

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Doug,

If the part number for that slinger is 105.00.17.227.00 (25mm length) or 105.00.17.227.01 (18.5mm length) then I have some ...... but I cannot remember which type as I have yet to add them to my big list. Essentially, it is a thin-wall brass tube with a straight flare at one end, which might not be impossible to achieve on a lathe with the right forming tool.

Alex.
 

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Doug, I think the slinger is made of soft brass. It should fit snugly on the shaft and butt up against the circlip but the funnel should not touch the bearing. Also, the length might be critical, but I can't remember why, maybe to not interfere with the seal. I bet you could leave out this part with no serious consequences, at least for the first few years. If you are in a metropolitan area, you might contact a brass instrument repairman (trumpet, trombone, etc.) who could make one. He would probably have a correct size tube in his junk pile or, if not he could modify one. He would need the bearing and shaft with the circlp. The chances of finding a sympathetic technician in a busy city are small, but you might show up with the bearing and shaft and ask if he has a tube to fit. You would then need to flare the end or silver braze a cone-shaped end onto it. A lot of tedious work, but I know you are use to tedious work!
Larry Bono
 

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Yes, Alex is correct, it is thin-wall tubing, about .010" if I remember.
Larry Bono
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I got the impeller off with no problem once the seal was removed. In fact it was harder to remove the seal than it was to remove the impeller.

I cleaned up all of the parts and I am able to now determine the rough dimensions of the flange. We will see how mine comes out.

Thanks for the help.

Doug
 
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