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Discussion Starter #1
I've read several threads on the boards here discussing how people seem to have varied difficulty in removing the steering wheel and I for one am really having trouble. I have a 1961 Giuletta Spider that I'm in the process of tearing down for restoration. Most of the disassembly has been fairly straight forward, but the steering wheel is confounding me. I've used PB blaster along with a standard Y shaped puller using the three 4mm threaded holes. Of course, one doesn't want to crank too hard for risk of pulling the threads out of the tiny little holes, but I put enough pressure on thinking a few good hammer blows would do the trick. Not the case. The wheel just laughs at me. So, I'm looking for a source to rent/borrow/purchase an actual Alfa Romeo steering wheel puller. Any leads would be greatly appreciated.

Tim
 

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After tightening the puller to a straining point a firm whack with a STEEL hammer on the tightening screw head should work.. no go? then retigten and apply enough heat with propane .. enough to know it is too hot to hold your finger on the area but not so much to melt anything.
 

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Check out this post.Without the factory original style puller,Carl750s method using Les Hurlock's drawing and directions worked best for me.Take your time measuring/marking the two holes that you will have to drill and tap,making sure they are 180 degrees apart and located the same distance from center.It's important to drill each hole at the 3-O'clock position,this is a relatively clear area and avoids drilling into the turn signal assembly.FWIW,I drilled and tapped my holes 5/16"-18tpi,90 degrees from the keyway slot.Might sound difficult,but it's not.Using this method allows you to use a regular wheel puller,probably free borrowed from one of the big box auto stores.assist sought on steering wheel bolt
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the responses guys. I would have normally tried heat, but I have no idea how much is too much heat. Sure, red hot would be too much, but without heating a steering while like this and knowing the melting point of the plastic, I have no reference. 10 seconds? 30 seconds? 2 minutes? Drilling new holes would be my last resort.
 

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Thanks for the responses guys. I would have normally tried heat, but I have no idea how much is too much heat. Sure, red hot would be too much, but without heating a steering while like this and knowing the melting point of the plastic, I have no reference. 10 seconds? 30 seconds? 2 minutes? Drilling new holes would be my last resort.
As hot enough to melt butter in a frying pan .. It isn't much.. No hotter than a boiled egg you pull out of a pan of water... do the wheel .. not the nut. a pencil flame should be enough
 

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If your Giulietta wheel is in nice shape, I would hold off on using heat until you become desperate. I'd hate to see you damage the plastic in the wheel. If you must use heat, do as divotandtralee advises and limit yourself to a pencil-sized flame.

A generic steering wheel puller should be fine. Do Giulietta wheels really have three, threaded holes? I've only worked on 101 Giulias and 105's which have just two pulling holes, so I use a two bolt puller, like the one in the photo Alphil posted above. One technique I've had success with is to tighten the puller and just let it set for an hour or so. Sometimes the wheel will pop off after a prolonged force is applied. Or after more oil has soaked in.

Once you get it apart, apply NeverSeize when you re-assemble it, and you won't have this problem the next time. But you will still need a puller.
 

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Tim:
I have a 750 Sprint that was unmolested for 50 years before I had to remove the steering wheel. I know what you are going thru. I used a Posi-Lock 104 (on Ebay for $120) this puller has a way to lock the jaws in place. I filed the end of these arms to get a better engagement on the grooved neck of the steering wheel.
After having soaked the area and having the jaws tight in place left it under load, adding penetrating fluid as needed and frequently adding some hammer blows to the top of the jacking screw while re tightening. It might take to have it this way overnight or longer. It will come loose without any damage, plus you will have a great puller left over.

Good luck, Enrique.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks again everyone for you input and suggestions. I've had another person recommend using Kroil penetrant. I have some headed my way and will give it a shot. PB blaster seems to evaporate left sitting for a few hours. The wheel is in good shape so anything with heat or drilling will be my last resort.
 

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There are 3 different types of Giulietta steering wheel puller and none of them use the 3 little threaded holes you are referencing in Post #1 Vondie - those are for locating the horn ring bolts, rather don't use them as if you strip a thread out it will ruin your day

Version 1 has the 2 large threaded holes as shown by Phil is Post #3 - some steering wheels have these 2 large threaded holes, some don't - easy enough to drill & tap using the template Phil provided

Version 2 is the large tie rod end puller shown on page 162 of the Workshop Manual - Tool number 6121.12.090

Version 3 is a little more complicated, consists of 3 pieces. It's pretty much like the puller in version 2 --> cylindrical & the main puller has a lip machined into it which catches under the lip of the center section, the trick is that to fit it, the cylinder has to be split in half and then has a tight fitting steel sleeve over the outside which holds the 2 halves tightly in position so the bottom lip can catch the wheel and the threaded pin is then tightened down the middle like a normal puller.

Ciao
Greig
 

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Discussion Starter #10
There are 3 different types of Giulietta steering wheel puller and none of them use the 3 little threaded holes you are referencing in Post #1 Vondie - those are for locating the horn ring bolts, rather don't use them as if you strip a thread out it will ruin your day

Version 1 has the 2 large threaded holes as shown by Phil is Post #3 - some steering wheels have these 2 large threaded holes, some don't - easy enough to drill & tap using the template Phil provided

Version 2 is the large tie rod end puller shown on page 162 of the Workshop Manual - Tool number 6121.12.090

Version 3 is a little more complicated, consists of 3 pieces. It's pretty much like the puller in version 2 --> cylindrical & the main puller has a lip machined into it which catches under the lip of the center section, the trick is that to fit it, the cylinder has to be split in half and then has a tight fitting steel sleeve over the outside which holds the 2 halves tightly in position so the bottom lip can catch the wheel and the threaded pin is then tightened down the middle like a normal puller.

Ciao
Greig
Thank you Alfisiti. I'm aware that the three 4mm holes are the horn ring and not intended to remove the wheel. They just line up nicely with a standard Y style wheel puller that I already have. I knew going in not to put too much force on the holes and after failing with the removed, I posted here asking for help locating an actual Alfa tool. I don't have access to making a tool myself and hoped someone here might have one to rent/borrow/purchase.

Tim
 

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I found a series of tests on the Internet that revealed the best penetrating oil: it turns out that the best is the cheapest-a 50/50 mix of acetone and ATF fluid. An acquaintance, Paul Russell, and a restorer of many very pricey cars, uses the same penetrant.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I found a series of tests on the Internet that revealed the best penetrating oil: it turns out that the best is the cheapest-a 50/50 mix of acetone and ATF fluid. An acquaintance, Paul Russell, and a restorer of many very pricey cars, uses the same penetrant.
Very interesting. I'll have to give that a try.
 

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I just interjected the results I found on penetrating oils; I have no knowledge on how to remove a horn ring. I thought the info on acetone/ATF valuable for those wanting to remove rusted bolts/nuts.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Persistence has prevailed!! Thank you to GTD for his example of a puller. I was fortunate to be able to have a coworker turn up the parts to make my own tool in combination with the jack bolt / Nut combo from a common pulley puller.
 

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