Giulietta Brake line and tools - Alfa Romeo Bulletin Board & Forums
 4Likes
  • 1 Post By quadrifolio
  • 1 Post By Barn101
  • 1 Post By xalfaracer
  • 1 Post By xalfaracer
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-06-2019, 01:14 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
Platinum Subscriber
 
Lionel Velez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 925
Giulietta Brake line and tools

I am currently working on assembling some of my cars and I am to the point that need proper guidance as to the best source for brake lines and tools. Thus far, I will be looking into purchasing the Easwood flare kit as shown https://www.eastwood.com/professiona...ring-tool.html with all of the related bending tools . Additionally, I am looking into purchasing the steel brake line I believe is the 3/16 size. I would appreciate any advice and feedback as to the best possible solution or vendor to achieve all the required work and multiple cars.

Thanks in advance,

Lionel
Lionel Velez is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-06-2019, 10:31 PM
Registered User
 
quadrifolio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: South-Spain
Posts: 836
Hi Lionel, regarding the tool, is the best one you could purchase, Ive worked with it and it works like a charme, about the lines I wouldnt go steel, dificult to bend and to flare (it splits open when you flare it ) I will suggest to go with coper or kunifer instead of steel.

Best
John
Lionel Velez likes this.
quadrifolio is offline  
post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-13-2019, 07:17 PM
Registered User
 
Barn101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: In the snow belt of Ohio
Posts: 179
Lionel, I went with this. Copper/Nickel.

https://www.belmetric.com/metric-coi...jlv0hoqmn7vfh4
Lionel Velez likes this.

Last edited by Barn101; 08-13-2019 at 07:23 PM.
Barn101 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-14-2019, 12:35 PM
Senior Member
Gold Subscriber
 
xalfaracer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Rough and Ready, CA
Posts: 778
I will support the selection of the copper lines. It is much easier to work with and has a reputation for longevity. It is subject to corrosion so carefully consider your decision.

As to tools, I bought a flaring kit for the local Napa store and am happy with it. Much cheaper than Eastwood. I did buy a handy bender from Eastwood. It is great for making close bends as is necessary on the front brakes on a Giulietta. There is no part name or number on the tool but, if interested, I could post a picture of it or I could go onto the Eastwood Web site and find some kind of identifier.
Lionel Velez likes this.
xalfaracer is offline  
post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-14-2019, 01:01 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
Platinum Subscriber
 
Lionel Velez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 925
Thanks to everyone for the feedback and it is being taken into consideration. I considered the Napa tool option but when you are flaring lines for a total of seven cars on one shot I would suppose that the Eastwood tool would expedite the work for me. Time is a valuable and precious commodity and as I get older the more I value it. I was able to find just about everything I needed except for the threaded cap for the flex brake line fitting that goes at the end and anchored to the front suspension area. If you could post a photo of the Napa tool would be great. As John noted, Cunifer lines are Copper-Nickle mix and I have seen them for sale a various price point. At this point, I am not interested in bargain hunting for lines as I am more interested in the quality of the product. That said, more expensive is not always better. I appreciate all of the provided feedback.

Lionel
Lionel Velez is offline  
post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-14-2019, 02:12 PM
Senior Member
Gold Subscriber
 
xalfaracer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Rough and Ready, CA
Posts: 778
Lionel,

It isn't clear to me how one flaring tool can work faster than another. I'm old and I think slow but it still seems to me that a flare is a single operation. Unless Eastwood has a multi-flairer, that is. No offense intended here.

Anyway, the items in the picture are from left:
. Eastwood tube bender. I like it as it accommodates tight bends.
. Napa flaring tool. What I like about this tool is the recess you see on the arms. They fit over the tube holder and give more stability to the turning process.
. Above these items is a handy device if you are working on a car with fluid still in the lines. Snap it over the end of the open line and it stops any leakage.

Is this your first time with this process? If so, I have a few tips to share with you.
Attached Images
 
xalfaracer is offline  
post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-14-2019, 07:11 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
Platinum Subscriber
 
Lionel Velez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 925
Brake Line bending and flaring

I am somewhat familiar with the flaring process as I have done it before but nothing to the extent I am planning to perform soon. I am talking of completing the for 5 to 7 cars. The process of using the Eastwood tool seems to be a logical step to streamline a multiple-step process.

Here is a Youtube video of how the Eastwood works

Any tips will be greatly appreciated.

Lionel
Lionel Velez is offline  
post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-14-2019, 08:47 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Roseville, CA
Posts: 40
Garage
I recently completed replacing the brake lines on my Spider. There is a slight difference in SAE sized lines 3/16 from the metric lines. Using an SAE dimensioned lines with an DIN tool will leave slight imperfection on the lines but not critical failure. My lines are a combination of DIN double flare bubble and SAE flares you find on American cars. I used steel lines to replicate the factory appearance and I am happy with them. I used the tools in the images for the job and shopping the tools saved a lot of money most specially the Master Cool tool.
Attached Images
  
1800ASKMARK is offline  
post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-15-2019, 03:08 PM
Senior Member
Gold Subscriber
 
xalfaracer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Rough and Ready, CA
Posts: 778
Yup, now I see that this will save you time. I've likely seen that machine in the catalog but passed quickly by as I neither needed nor could afford it.

Based on my current understanding I doubt that any of my tips would apply. They were mostly in the tube preparation area. On the other hand, a reminder - remember to put the nuts on the tube in the proper orientation before making the last flare.

Good luck with the process.
Lionel Velez likes this.
xalfaracer is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Alfa Romeo Bulletin Board & Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome