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  Topic Review (Newest First)
09-21-2019 01:53 PM
richardbradford Thanks Steve,

Will probably drop tank too as have replacement to go in and want to change those brake lines too. A good chance to change the fuel filter and treat the bits of corossion starting to show around it.

Cheers.
09-21-2019 01:24 PM
Alfisto Steve
Quote:
Originally Posted by richardbradford View Post
Thanks Guys.

Steve, am pretty much heading your route now. Bought a 6mm cobalt drill bit in case have to drill final bolt out, after angle grinding off long bits.

How did you access the 3 nuts on top of the struts? Through the boot with something like a swan neck spanner or from above via the parcel shelf?

Did you manage to leave the rear brake balancer cylinder in situ? I.e. was it possible to slide it off the subframe without having to undo the hydraulics?

Great posts/pics by the way.

Thanks again,

Richard
I accessed three 13mm nuts on top of strut going in trunk/boot area under rear speaker area with a socket and ratchet. Pull out sound deadening material on top of strut tower first.

You maybe able to unbolt brake valve from rear cross member but long brake lines go over top of gas tank and shorter lines go out to brake calibers. So you probably will have to disconnect short lines from hoses in wheel well.

Parking brake wire cables may have to be disconnected from calipers, too.

I ended up removing and replacing everything in both front and rear suspension and brake system as well as gas tank and gas lines/brake line all the way to engine bay.
09-21-2019 12:22 PM
richardbradford Thanks Guys.

Steve, am pretty much heading your route now. Bought a 6mm cobalt drill bit in case have to drill final bolt out, after angle grinding off long bits.

How did you access the 3 nuts on top of the struts? Through the boot with something like a swan neck spanner or from above via the parcel shelf?

Did you manage to leave the rear brake balancer cylinder in situ? I.e. was it possible to slide it off the subframe without having to undo the hydraulics?

Great posts/pics by the way.

Thanks again,

Richard
09-20-2019 04:45 AM
Alfisto Steve
Quote:
Originally Posted by richardbradford View Post
Help!
Today got the car up on a friends ramps and managed to bang out the 8" long bolt on the bottom struts on one side, after about an hour of freeing the lateral arms up. On the other side - zero joy. Hammering it hard (club hammer), breaker bar adding torque on the head end - nothing. Took out the 5" bolt above it and moved the stub axle in/out a bit relative to the strut so the bae of the strut is free - just nothing else.
With a longer breaker bar had the head turning a bit, though zero visible movement in the rest of the bolt. Not even in the open middle section between the stub axle sides.
Considered using butane/propane to apply heat but the strut/shock is too close and it would burn the bush in the stub axle, possibly the ABS sensor too.
Another option am considering is just dropping the rear subframe, stub axle/trailing arm and that strut as one then trying to get the bolt out. While it is on the car the rubber bushings take the jarring out of the hammering, reducing the ability to break the corrosion on the bolt.

Any suggestions would be really very welcome.

A final though: has anyone tried snapping the bolt head off and then using the nut on the other end to pull the remains out?

Here is what I did to get rear suspension apart on BB2 back in 2011:
https://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/1015722-post36.html

https://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/1015724-post37.html
09-19-2019 07:28 PM
Rogue Leader
Quote:
Originally Posted by richardbradford View Post
Help!
Today got the car up on a friends ramps and managed to bang out the 8" long bolt on the bottom struts on one side, after about an hour of freeing the lateral arms up. On the other side - zero joy. Hammering it hard (club hammer), breaker bar adding torque on the head end - nothing. Took out the 5" bolt above it and moved the stub axle in/out a bit relative to the strut so the bae of the strut is free - just nothing else.
With a longer breaker bar had the head turning a bit, though zero visible movement in the rest of the bolt. Not even in the open middle section between the stub axle sides.
Considered using butane/propane to apply heat but the strut/shock is too close and it would burn the bush in the stub axle, possibly the ABS sensor too.
Another option am considering is just dropping the rear subframe, stub axle/trailing arm and that strut as one then trying to get the bolt out. While it is on the car the rubber bushings take the jarring out of the hammering, reducing the ability to break the corrosion on the bolt.

Any suggestions would be really very welcome.

A final though: has anyone tried snapping the bolt head off and then using the nut on the other end to pull the remains out?
Wow yours are worse than mine.

I used VERY liberal amounts of pb blaster which I sprayed on multiple times over the period of days. And once I got the bolt in somewhat i used a screwdriver to drive it out through the hole.
09-19-2019 05:22 PM
richardbradford Help!
Today got the car up on a friends ramps and managed to bang out the 8" long bolt on the bottom struts on one side, after about an hour of freeing the lateral arms up. On the other side - zero joy. Hammering it hard (club hammer), breaker bar adding torque on the head end - nothing. Took out the 5" bolt above it and moved the stub axle in/out a bit relative to the strut so the bae of the strut is free - just nothing else.
With a longer breaker bar had the head turning a bit, though zero visible movement in the rest of the bolt. Not even in the open middle section between the stub axle sides.
Considered using butane/propane to apply heat but the strut/shock is too close and it would burn the bush in the stub axle, possibly the ABS sensor too.
Another option am considering is just dropping the rear subframe, stub axle/trailing arm and that strut as one then trying to get the bolt out. While it is on the car the rubber bushings take the jarring out of the hammering, reducing the ability to break the corrosion on the bolt.

Any suggestions would be really very welcome.

A final though: has anyone tried snapping the bolt head off and then using the nut on the other end to pull the remains out?
09-05-2019 01:04 PM
richardbradford Just to say, found the rear clearance of my 164 on the ground is high enough for me to slide underneath with spanners in hand and tighten the rear suspension bolts, now in their natural position. How did I miss this before? It totally answers all previous ideas of spring compressors or jacks or wheel ramps.

By the way, also found that the lower rear strut suspension bolts, the 105mm and 200mm (205mm) M10s, are (EU/UK) grade 10 steel, not sure what the US equivalent is, with special zinc coating. Think it is thicker than even passivated yellow zinc. As temporary measure, have grade 8.8 (UK/EU) 110mm bolts in the top holes of the bottom struts. This is still really strong steel and probably strong enough to rip through the strut itself before breaking. Not managed to free up the long lower bolts yet - still spraying them with variety of rust penetrating stuff and got some emery paper strips to clean up their exposed shafts.

Hope this helps.
07-30-2019 01:43 PM
Alfissimo Int.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogue Leader View Post
They will but you also don't want to load up your suspension with those bushings way off, you can damage them if they are far enough off to begin with. Its only supposed to deflect within a small range. This was the basic concern of my initial question, because clearly doing it that way would quickly damage the bushing.

Why tighten the crap out of them when you are going to need to loosen them and retorque anyway. Just leave them lightly attached so they will 0 out when the suspension loads up, and then tighten them properly.
Exactly! All I stated was leave them loose as in not tightened to spec. Just tighten enough to hold them in place but loose enough so everything moves. Also similar to doing an alignment, bounce the car up and down a few times to settle the suspension before tightening the bolts/nuts.

07-30-2019 01:14 PM
Rogue Leader
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Smith View Post
You don't need to leave any bolts loose. When you have loaded the suspension accurately you can back off and retorque the bolts and the bushings will release and reset as you back off the bolts.

They will but you also don't want to load up your suspension with those bushings way off, you can damage them if they are far enough off to begin with. Its only supposed to deflect within a small range. This was the basic concern of my initial question, because clearly doing it that way would quickly damage the bushing.

Why tighten the crap out of them when you are going to need to loosen them and retorque anyway. Just leave them lightly attached so they will 0 out when the suspension loads up, and then tighten them properly.
07-30-2019 12:03 PM
Michael Smith You don't need to leave any bolts loose. When you have loaded the suspension accurately you can back off and retorque the bolts and the bushings will release and reset as you back off the bolts.
07-30-2019 08:41 AM
Alfissimo Int. Do not keep rear subframe bolts to chassis loose. Tighten those up to spec. Just leave all the suspension arm bolts loose. :P
07-30-2019 07:51 AM
Alfissimo Int. No need to make it difficult.

Put it all back together, keep bolts just enough loose. Either jack up rear end (from middle of rear) and put jack stands under hubs to compress suspension like it is on the ground (be careful though), tighten up everything to spec. Or put wheels on, put blocks under wheels and tighten up on the ground.

No fancy lifts etc...
07-30-2019 06:54 AM
Rogue Leader
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Smith View Post
Easiest would be to torque everything up and then have the suspension loosened and retorqued while the car was on the type of lift that lifts the car by the wheels.
Agreed, unfortunately since most of us don't have that its more of a how much money do you want to spend to do that part?

Or just had another idea, I have a car trailer with an open deck, can drive the car up on it and do it that way as well.
07-30-2019 05:31 AM
Michael Smith That's a low pressure gas strut just btw. You can lift those by hand. Even high pressure gas struts exert very little pressure.

As for the spring compressor slipping well so can a jack. The spring is restrained anyway. It's not as if you'd be dealing with a compressed but otherwise totally free spring.

The main reason not to use a spring compressor is that an ordinary jack could be used instead. The key element either way would be to know the ride height you need to simulate.

Easiest would be to torque everything up and then have the suspension loosened and retorqued while the car was on the type of lift that lifts the car by the wheels.
07-29-2019 01:18 PM
richardbradford Rougue Leader, you are right. I totally missed the element that the damper will remain fully extended. Glad you pointed it out before I tried it and had one of those 'Duh' realisations. Would be confident the compressors wouldn't slip off as they would hook around the curved bottom of the strut and the spring coils but the exercise itself would be totally pointless, as you have correctly pointed out - unless something like a bottle jack was used to squash the damper too - wouldn't lift the car with the spring compressed.

Personally not too keen on the plank idea stability wise so have got round it here by buying a pair of wide car ramps to safely raise the rear wheels enough to gain bolt access, while the front can be raised with a trolly jack and axle stands. Problem solved, at last.
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