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  Topic Review (Newest First)
03-30-2006 08:42 AM
Gary labate Interesting that in this book “When Nuvolari Raced…” it identifies the car in one page as a 3800cc and later as a 3200cc on another page in the book.
03-26-2006 05:19 PM
joecautela I came across the 6/77 issue of Road&Track, their 30th anniversary. In it is a centerfold picture of Phil Hill with the 159 and a 5 page story by him of the history of the car. There also are numerous photos. In 1947 The 159 Alfetta was R&T's inaugaral issue subject.
03-26-2006 04:49 PM
dretceterini
Quote:
Originally Posted by gtv2000
Hey, going into private, er?

Well, Scuderia Ferrari is a concern, but I would indeed prefer an Italian version, usually cheaper and easier reading yet for me. I've been offered several, but won't spend more than I'm willing to.

The other one is "Cento Manifesti". Really nice, and missed it just because, once in Milan, I had to choose my spending, according to money and weight. I happened to buy, among the many then available, those that later proved easier to find, despite expectations, for instance "Immagini e percorsi", that was the catalogue of an exhibition. Now it's rare to come across Cento Manifesti, usually expensive, and I have copies of most of the ads it contains, but it's still a nice book.
Gee, I guessed right! Let me see if I can find copies for you at realistic prices. I did find a copy of Scuderia Ferrari in Italian here in the US for about $100 something like 3 years ago, although the last copy I saw in English had a $600 asking price!
03-26-2006 03:01 PM
gtv2000
Quote:
Originally Posted by dretceterini
Just which two are the ones that you need?
Hey, going into private, er?

Well, Scuderia Ferrari is a concern, but I would indeed prefer an Italian version, usually cheaper and easier reading yet for me. I've been offered several, but won't spend more than I'm willing to.

The other one is "Cento Manifesti". Really nice, and missed it just because, once in Milan, I had to choose my spending, according to money and weight. I happened to buy, among the many then available, those that later proved easier to find, despite expectations, for instance "Immagini e percorsi", that was the catalogue of an exhibition. Now it's rare to come across Cento Manifesti, usually expensive, and I have copies of most of the ads it contains, but it's still a nice book.
03-26-2006 08:02 AM
dretceterini
Quote:
Originally Posted by gtv2000
I'm currently reading it with much pleasure and interest. Ed McDonough for sure found interesting sources about the 158 project origins, and give a good view into the circumstances of his birth.

One step further, when mentioning drawings and ideas dating back to late 1935 - early 1936, would have been to point out that, in that era, it was not rare at all that great designers would carry out at home, on spare time, projects for advanced vehicles or racing ones. Merosi, Jano and, after the war, Busso did so, sometimes for important projects. Little wonder, thus that Colombo had ideas of the layout for a voiturette already in mind or on paper if he then managed to design the whole car over a few months from May 1937.

So far the only page that made me feel sorry is where Ed, who previously warned against legendary stories carried over from one publication to later ones, comes up again with the legend of a 3.8 litre Tipo B for the 1935 German GP. Not only it isn't true, but it would have been impossible, since the overall size of the enlarged engines would by no way squeeze into a Tipo B chassis.

This detail point having been made, I join Gary in recommending the book to everyone willing to know more on the 158/159 icon.

And, Gary, your Alfa books shelf is a nice one. Personally, I miss badly two of the books shown on the picture

Just which two are the ones that you need?
03-23-2006 07:40 PM
dretceterini
Quote:
Originally Posted by richardowen
SOLD! hehe.

I've seen so many examples I know nothing about. Especially all those Rosso Bianco oddities.
There was already one on e-bay...
03-23-2006 06:13 PM
richardowen
Quote:
Originally Posted by dretceterini
Best book available on the T33s!
SOLD! hehe.

I've seen so many examples I know nothing about. Especially all those Rosso Bianco oddities.
03-23-2006 05:37 PM
dretceterini
Quote:
Originally Posted by richardowen
Amazon has it for $22.00

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/186...Fencoding=UTF8

Curious, does anyone know how good the following book is?

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/190...Fencoding=UTF8

Alfa Romeo Tipo 33: The Development & Race History by Peter Collins, Ed McDonough.

Cheers!
Best book available on the T33s!
03-23-2006 04:04 PM
richardowen Amazon has it for $22.00

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/186...Fencoding=UTF8

Curious, does anyone know how good the following book is?

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/190...Fencoding=UTF8

Alfa Romeo Tipo 33: The Development & Race History by Peter Collins, Ed McDonough.

Cheers!
03-18-2006 02:11 PM
Gary labate Thanks! Very interesting...
03-17-2006 05:49 PM
gtv2000
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary labat
I am interested in your comment about the Tipo B not having a 3.8 litre engine. Is the 3.8 litre engine actually larger in it’s external dimensions then the 3.2 litre? I am certainly not an expert on the subject but most of the books I have seem to point to there being 3.8 litre engines in more then one Tipo B.

I’ve included a few for your comment; I find it interesting to know what engines sizes were in use.
Indeed, interesting books...

The point is that is has long been believed so, and the link below might show you that I've been believing the same sources as you do until post 26 in the following thread:

http://forums.autosport.com/showthre...ye+1935+german

I reckon Simon Moore is the most authorized voice on such a matter.

Quote:
Also in the book ‘The Scuderia Ferrari’ on page 307 it states that during the 1935 German GP Nuvolari’s ‘P3” was fitted with special ‘Nurburgring’ Englebert tyres which had 6mm thread instead of the usual 4mm used everywhere else. Do you have any comments about the advantage Nuvolari had with his tires?
That rings a bell, but I cannot comment by memory.
03-16-2006 05:00 PM
Gary labate Gtv2000, thanks for the nice comment about my Alfa book shelf.

I am interested in your comment about the Tipo B not having a 3.8 litre engine. Is the 3.8 litre engine actually larger in it’s external dimensions then the 3.2 litre? I am certainly not an expert on the subject but most of the books I have seem to point to there being 3.8 litre engines in more then one Tipo B.

I’ve included a few for your comment; I find it interesting to know what engines sizes were in use.

Also in the book ‘The Scuderia Ferrari’ on page 307 it states that during the 1935 German GP Nuvolari’s ‘P3” was fitted with special ‘Nurburgring’ Englebert tyres which had 6mm thread instead of the usual 4mm used everywhere else. Do you have any comments about the advantage Nuvolari had with his tires?
03-13-2006 04:37 AM
gtv2000 I'm currently reading it with much pleasure and interest. Ed McDonough for sure found interesting sources about the 158 project origins, and give a good view into the circumstances of his birth.

One step further, when mentioning drawings and ideas dating back to late 1935 - early 1936, would have been to point out that, in that era, it was not rare at all that great designers would carry out at home, on spare time, projects for advanced vehicles or racing ones. Merosi, Jano and, after the war, Busso did so, sometimes for important projects. Little wonder, thus that Colombo had ideas of the layout for a voiturette already in mind or on paper if he then managed to design the whole car over a few months from May 1937.

So far the only page that made me feel sorry is where Ed, who previously warned against legendary stories carried over from one publication to later ones, comes up again with the legend of a 3.8 litre Tipo B for the 1935 German GP. Not only it isn't true, but it would have been impossible, since the overall size of the enlarged engines would by no way squeeze into a Tipo B chassis.

This detail point having been made, I join Gary in recommending the book to everyone willing to know more on the 158/159 icon.

And, Gary, your Alfa books shelf is a nice one. Personally, I miss badly two of the books shown on the picture
03-03-2006 10:41 PM
dretceterini A copy is currently available on e-pay at about $25!
03-03-2006 05:07 PM
Gary labate
Alfetta Type 158/159 Book

I just finished reading the book, Alfetta -The Alfa Romeo 158/159 Grand Prix Car. I wanted to pass on to the members, that in my opinion I found it very well written and worth reading. It will certainly go into my bookcase along with the other automobile books I have.

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