Milano A/C - Page 2 - Alfa Romeo Bulletin Board & Forums
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post #16 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-11-2017, 05:08 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Midelectric View Post
I would guess that an ES30 has the 75 HVAC system, which was different than the Milano's. The 75 heater valve used a capillary tube to measure the evaporator temp and crack open the heater to keep it from freezing over. It may be doing just that when you see the outlet temp increase. Maybe there's an adjustment on the heater valve to dial it back.
Yes, no doubt since is was a Euro car, not destined for US market. I obtained the Shop Manual and will review for possible adjustment. It was the "hunting" that was the problem as you carefully discerned. Thanks, B
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post #17 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-13-2017, 09:44 AM
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Keeping heat out of the car is a big help. Any heat that did not come in is heat that does not have to come out. A reflective windshield panel made a big difference for me, when I have to park in a lot. Don't bother with the expensive custom fit Heatshield brand - almost $50 and it did not fit. I commend them, they refunded my money with no hassle, but said it was not worth it to them to source a car and make one that fit. I can see why, not a lot of demand for Milano heat shields. A $5 cheapy from Wal-Mart does the trick, though. Also, a dash rug helps a lot. I have a black dash and it acts like a heater when the sun comes through the windshield. Got mine from Coverking, custom fit, and it does fit nicely.
I know, that does not fix the A/C, but it makes what I have work better. It is almost bearable. (In Houston).
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post #18 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-13-2017, 01:12 PM
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I second the idea about a new condenser, the parallel flow condensers are supposed to be ~40% more efficient than older stock ones.
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post #19 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-14-2017, 10:32 AM
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one other thought re: heater system.
If the core is always "hot" and the heat is controlled by a blend door (not sure of the type of system),in addition to opening problem mentioned above,, the seals on the flapper can deteriorate and thus let heat continuously into the cabin. he quick and dirty solution is to install a valve in the engine so that during the summer there is no coolant to the cabin (there are also solenoids that do this). If it were mine, i would probably do it regardless, because a) you live in Texas and heat is less important than AC, b)there is a hot heater core radiating into the cabin which requires the AC to do some amount of offset (it might be minor or major), and c) it is relatively easy to do
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post #20 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-15-2017, 08:22 PM
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"If the core is always "hot" and the heat is controlled by a blend door'

The 164 is set up that way, and we install either a manual Pex ball valve or an electric ball valve somewhere in the engine bay to cut off the flow of hot coolant into the heater core during the summer so that the a/c works better. Works like a champ.

DO NOT use a standard Murray screw valve. They corrode and freeze up.

Since the 164 heater cores have a habit of leaking after a few years (cracked plastic tank ends, just like the radiator), I might also install a manual Pex valve in the return line from the heater core to be able to totally isolate that el cheapo core.

Would like to do this for the LS, but that would involve intricate plumbing since the hoses from the engine are shorter and closer to the firewall.

In any event, I recommend using a ball valve for the continually hot core problem.
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1989 Milano, Shankle Sport
1991 164S, stock
1994 164LS (~Q)
1972 Morgan 27

previously owned since 1964:

62 Morris MiniMinor 850, 67 Austin 1275 Cooper S (Downton 3/4 race), 64 Giulia Sprint GT (1st red one made), 72 Fiat 128 Sedan, 75 Alfetta Sedan, 78 Alfetta Sedan, 78 GTV, 81 GTV6, 86 GTV6

Last edited by Del; 07-16-2017 at 04:17 PM.
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post #21 of 32 (permalink) Old 08-09-2017, 01:40 PM
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Whats the largest you could fit in that? I have some Italian made PF condensers in stock that I am going to sale off here. They are very well made units.

Let me know? I am curious to dimensions of OEM and if a larger or Longer one can fit for more surface area?

I believe it's 370mm (12) x405mm (15.95) Same condenser as 75/Milano. P/N 60527927



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post #22 of 32 (permalink) Old 08-09-2017, 07:43 PM
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Basically, we thought the Milano a/c to be just adequate even driving to Las Vegas in summer, which is hot hot hot. Not nearly as good as the 94 LS or even the 91S, but still...

We survived, except for the Milano over heating in Phoenix stop and go driving in 113F. That was a killer, and I can see why Alfa stopped supplying the 2.5L Milano radiator, the 3.0L version being better. The basic Milano cooling system just not able to keep up.

Our Milano's system has been untouched since 89, and it still works, sort of, although I'm sure the R12 level is way down. Doesn't cool like it did. Hard to find a place which will touch the R12 yet. One a/c repair place, which didn't, told us to forget changing to 134a, as we did with the 91S, and just pay the price for having more R12 put in, checking with dye first for leaks, and then topping off with R12.

They were pretty adamant about not filling with a substitute gas. No way, no how!!! Well...

Del

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1989 Milano, Shankle Sport
1991 164S, stock
1994 164LS (~Q)
1972 Morgan 27

previously owned since 1964:

62 Morris MiniMinor 850, 67 Austin 1275 Cooper S (Downton 3/4 race), 64 Giulia Sprint GT (1st red one made), 72 Fiat 128 Sedan, 75 Alfetta Sedan, 78 Alfetta Sedan, 78 GTV, 81 GTV6, 86 GTV6

Last edited by Del; 08-09-2017 at 07:49 PM.
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post #23 of 32 (permalink) Old 08-10-2017, 09:36 AM Thread Starter
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Once the SZ heatsoaks in the 100 deg sun, it can take 1-2 hours to cool down inside with all the windows. Driving out of the garage it does fine to a destination but not with stop and go traffic. Most def undersized for hot, hot, hot places. If it was a Milano I'd modify at the drop of a hat for a frequent driver.
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post #24 of 32 (permalink) Old 08-10-2017, 07:47 PM
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Quote:
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Our Milano's system has been untouched since 89, and it still works, sort of, although I'm sure the R12 level is way down. Doesn't cool like it did. Hard to find a place which will touch the R12 yet. One a/c repair place, which didn't, told us to forget changing to 134a, as we did with the 91S, and just pay the price for having more R12 put in, checking with dye first for leaks, and then topping off with R12.

They were pretty adamant about not filling with a substitute gas. No way, no how!!! Well...
Just FYI but R12 is not that hard to get. You can do an online course to get automotive HVAC certification and can then legally purchase it and recharge your own system.
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post #25 of 32 (permalink) Old 08-10-2017, 07:53 PM
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Oh, there are shops where I can get it done. The gal gave me a list. They just chose to stay away from it themselves. Just allowed that the price for R12 would be high compared to 134a.

Del

Seattle

1989 Milano, Shankle Sport
1991 164S, stock
1994 164LS (~Q)
1972 Morgan 27

previously owned since 1964:

62 Morris MiniMinor 850, 67 Austin 1275 Cooper S (Downton 3/4 race), 64 Giulia Sprint GT (1st red one made), 72 Fiat 128 Sedan, 75 Alfetta Sedan, 78 Alfetta Sedan, 78 GTV, 81 GTV6, 86 GTV6
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post #26 of 32 (permalink) Old 08-10-2017, 08:00 PM
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Oh, there are shops where I can get it done. The gal gave me a list. They just chose to stay away from it themselves. Just allowed that the price for R12 would be high compared to 134a.
The cost for R12 gas is expensive. But when you figure all of the other parts of the system (plus the labor) you would need to change to convert to R134a I'm not sure there is an actual savings.

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post #27 of 32 (permalink) Old 08-10-2017, 08:48 PM
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I agree, plus, we need a/c so seldom here, it's not worth even bothering to top up the low mileage Milano with the R12 anyway.

Del

Seattle

1989 Milano, Shankle Sport
1991 164S, stock
1994 164LS (~Q)
1972 Morgan 27

previously owned since 1964:

62 Morris MiniMinor 850, 67 Austin 1275 Cooper S (Downton 3/4 race), 64 Giulia Sprint GT (1st red one made), 72 Fiat 128 Sedan, 75 Alfetta Sedan, 78 Alfetta Sedan, 78 GTV, 81 GTV6, 86 GTV6
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post #28 of 32 (permalink) Old 08-11-2017, 06:18 AM
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The cost for R12 gas is expensive. But when you figure all of the other parts of the system (plus the labor) you would need to change to convert to R134a I'm not sure there is an actual savings.
I've posted this before but years ago the local Alfa mechanic told me there is no need to change anything, just thoroughly vacuum out the system and add R134a. Years later it still works great, well as good as any Milano AC.

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post #29 of 32 (permalink) Old 08-16-2017, 05:06 AM
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Guys these cars are not meant to be driven in hot humid weather.....I only take them out when the weather is cool and pleasant, that's why they should never be your daily driver car....

Milano's have issues also overheating in traffic with A/C on.

You can't compare to modern cars which the A/C system is superb in hot weather in traffic the gauge never moves above 180 degrees.
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post #30 of 32 (permalink) Old 08-16-2017, 08:03 AM
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Quote:
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Guys these cars are not meant to be driven in hot humid weather.....I only take them out when the weather is cool and pleasant, that's why they should never be your daily driver car....

Milano's have issues also overheating in traffic with A/C on.
LOL. I daily drove my Milano for ten years and ran the A/C all summer. It never overheated or dumped coolant. The A/C on mine was converted to 134A: wasn't as good as a modern car but was adequate on hot days.

The temperature gauge on the Milano moves around a lot. Sometimes it would show a bit warm (~212F indicated) but that's nowhere close to overheating.

If your Milano is overheating with the A/C on in summer, something is wrong with the cooling system.

Tom

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