AC Installation in a GTV 2000 Part I - Alfa Romeo Bulletin Board & Forums
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post #1 of 46 (permalink) Old 10-22-2010, 03:25 AM Thread Starter
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AC Installation in a GTV 2000 Part I

About a year ago I decided that driving around Perth, Western Australia was freaking hot and an AC unit would make driving my Alfa all the more worthwhile. I started researching how to install an AC in my car and sourced the manuals from car disk international. I decided that I wanted to maintain the original appearance of the GTV 2000 model and so I set about sourcing many of the original parts.

Original parts included:

1. Borletti Evaporator Box from - http://www.alfapartsexchange.com/main.htm
2. Compressor Bracket that is mounted to studs protruding from the cylinder head - purchased off someone on this forum;
3. Compressor bracket used to stabilise the compressor - purchased off someone on this forum;
4. Heater Control Trim for AC model - from www.international-auto.com;
5. Air Conditioner decal for rear window - from www.mtcarmelspares.com
6. Double V belt engine pulley from - www.cilebertimotors.com.au
7. An old centre console from www.cilebertimotors.com.au that I repaired with fibre glass and that I trimmed to shape (badly I might add). Having done this I sent it to http://wuscomau-001-site1.ctempurl.com/wct/ and they recovered with it with new vinyl;
8. Small Alfa badge for centre console - also sourced from http://www.alfapartsexchange.com/main.htm

Sourcing these original parts took almost 12 months.

Non-original parts included:

1. Odyssey PC925 Battery - from www.batteriesdirect.com.au
2. Taylor 300 Aluminium Battery Box - from Summit Racing;
3. Battery cables (1 gauge or 7.35mm diameter);
4. Derale Tornado 12 inch electric fan (16512) from www.centreline.com
5. York to Sanden conversion bracket - www.nostalgicairparts.com
6. Sanden SD7H15 Compresser - www.nostalgicairparts.com
7. 12x14" Parallel Condenser - www.nostalgicairparts.com
8. Air Cleaner and tubing (not yet purchased);
9. Hushmat insulation;
10. 10" inch curved blade electric fan for the condenser - www.nostalgicairparts.com


The first task was to ensure the evaporator box was tickety-boo and so I took this to an Auto Air Shop in Perth and they pressure tested the unit and fitted an expansion value suitable for R134a refrigerant. As the evaporator was dismantled I took the opportunity to replace the fan motor and the temperature sensor used to activate the switch to the Compressor; I replaced the foam that sits on the outer side of the heater core (top and bottom) as shown in the picture below. Section B shows where this foam needs to be trimmed to allow the hot air to divert through to the demisters. Notice that in section A the Evaporator fins have been straightened however I learned that these need to be bent over flat to ensure that the air flap can open and close properly once the unit is assembled.

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AC Brackets. The stabaliser bracket was taken to Pedders to have the bushes replaced (not showin in this picture). Too much vibration from the Compressor could crack my head.
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Demister tubes from top of Borletti Evaporator Box
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Wiring harness
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Thermastat
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I also recovered the inside top of the box with plastic contact paper to replace the plastic that blocked off the channels in the ceiling of the Evaporator box (lord knows what these were for).

Having completed this the next stage was to remove the old heater unit from the car and install the Borletti Evaporator box into the car. I'll get to this in my next post...

Last edited by WA-Alfa; 06-23-2017 at 06:45 AM. Reason: Updated some of the expired links
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post #2 of 46 (permalink) Old 10-25-2010, 03:09 AM Thread Starter
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AC Installation in a GTV 2000 Part I - Engine Brackets

In this photo you can see the two brackets attached to the engine. The large bracket that mounts to the front of the cylinder head has a pulley belt tensioner on it that has been removed as the radiator shroud protrudes too far into the engine bay for this to fit. The shroud will need to be removed. This bracket and the double groove engine pulley (which can't be seen in this photo) created problems for the engine fan and this had to be removed also.

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The Odyssey PC925 Battery was located in a sealed Taylor 300 Aluminium Battery Box and was earthed in the boot. The cranking cable went under the carpet on the passenger's side and through the firewall. Originally the earth wasn't working well enough and the car tried to earth through a small brown wire on the alternator which melted when I attempted to crank the car. Once another earth was put in from the chassis to the gear box and from the AC bracket to the chassis (will have to relocate this later) no further problems were experienced - touch wood. My examination of the Alfetta AC manuals shows an earth from the AC compressor to the chassis if I am not mistaken. This said I will be keeping a close eye on it. The car starts normally and the battery seems to be coping ok. The car does have a passive amp drain due to the presets on the Stereo and the immobiliser is a transponder type but I am hoping that the PC925 should have enough juice to cope with this if driven at least once per month. I will keep the forum posted on the longer term success of this installation choice.

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I have yet to get around to properly sealing and then venting this box and I was a little disappointed that is was advertised as sealed but this is a bit of a liberal use of the word I think.

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I spoke to a number of auto electricians who indicated that it was not possible to have a fuse on a cranking cable as the starter motor would draw too many amps however I am not convinced and I will continue to search for an appropriate fuse or circuit breaker.

Thanks are due to Leo at Cileberti Motors (Osborne Park) for helping me with this installation and indeed doing much of the work.

Last edited by WA-Alfa; 01-26-2013 at 02:19 PM.
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post #3 of 46 (permalink) Old 10-25-2010, 03:38 AM Thread Starter
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AC Installation in a GTV 2000 Part I - Evaporator Box

The evaporators for this model included a heater core and this presented various problems as I was inable to get an appropriate heater tap. I think that a heater tap shown below in the picture (bottom left) works best however I broke this during installation and used one of the others shown in this picture. The temperature sensor tube I just cut off and bent closed as I didnt think this worked anyways.

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The heater core needed to have the foam replaced and I sourced this from my local Auto AC repairer. I think this foam is used to control the air flow through the evaporator and heater core. Note that in the picture shown that the foam has not been trimmed to allow the air to divert through the deministers as it should. This I trimmed before installation.

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The inside of the evaporator was covered with plastic contact paper to seal the channels in the top of the box (lord knows what these were used for and why these were sealed with a thin plastic film in the first place) and I also enlarged the holes in the bottom piece of flat plastic that sits in the bottom of the box to assist with drainage of water from the evaporator. I sealed this piece of plastic in place with silicone.

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An expansion value suitable for R134a was fitted and the unit flushed and pressure tested by my local Auto AC Repairer. The 12v blower motor was replaced and I also took the opportunity to replace the Compressor thermostat although I had great difficulty in finding one small enough to fit inside the unit. Once reassembled I was ready to remove the heater unit from my car and install the Borletti Evaporator box.

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Last edited by WA-Alfa; 10-26-2010 at 10:35 PM.
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post #4 of 46 (permalink) Old 10-25-2010, 04:07 AM Thread Starter
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AC Installation in a GTV 2000 Part I - Install Evaporator

In order to remove the heater unit from the car - the heater hoses were removed and blocked off so that I didn't have to drain all the coolant from the car. The centre console was removed and the heater control cables disconnected. There are four bolts that secure the unit to the underside of the cowl and these were unscrewed and the unit wriggled out of the car. It is not necessary to remove anything else to get the unit out. once out I was confronted with a problem. On the RHD version of the car the heater tap is located on the left hand side of the heater. However, my Borletti Evaporator Box was sourced from the US and the heater tap was on the right hand side. The Evaporator Unit is also larger than the heater box and therefore takes up more room on the right hand side leaving very little room to move. Unfortunately the cowl drain hose exists directly above the Borletti Evaporator box on the right hand side and there is almost no room to install the drain hose and have the box in its proper position. My Alfa mechanic was unable to solve this problem and advised going to a panel beater to relocate the cowl's drain.

I decided that a combination of psychology and brute force was require to coax the box into position. With the heater box out and fast asleep I connected the cowl drain hose under the cover of darkness. Wearing a disguise so that no one would be able to identify me I placed a very think black piece of rubber around the top of the Evaporator box such that this piece of rubber would serve as a seal between the Evaporator unit and the underside of the cowl. The thickness of the rubber seal lowered the box slightly giving me more room to install the unit without crimping the cowl drain hose. I attached washers and nuts to the thread of the bolts that protrude from the underside of the cowl but I attached these at the tip (or end) of the bolts leaving me about 10mm to try and slide the top of the evaporator in between the washers and the underside of the cowl. With this only just fitting I quickly bolted the left hand side of the unit in place and used 2 extensions and a socket swivel to tighten the driver side bolts. Visability was obscured by the cowl drain hose and I had to do this blind and by touch as I was unable to see the bolts while I tightened this Evaporator in place. In theory I could have been tightening almost anything. This was extremely difficult to pull off and required a sustained tirade of cursing and bad language and I have no idea how this problem was overcome originally - maybe swearing in Italian would be more efficacious next time. To remove the Evaporator box in the future I only need to unscrew the nuts on the left hand side of the unit and then jerk or slide it to the left and it should drop down. I tried not to tighten the nuts on the right hand side too much in case I wanted to remove it in the future. I did this because I worried that there was a risk that the blower motor blades may scrape on the sides of the box when assesmbed and so I was very very careful to ensure that they turned freely before I assembled the box. I hope that they continue to turn freely when the fan is operating at speed.

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Sadly now my Evaporator box looks a little crooked but at least it is a start. Once I have this sorted I will install the condensor and electric fan.

Last edited by WA-Alfa; 10-25-2010 at 08:10 AM.
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post #5 of 46 (permalink) Old 10-25-2010, 07:37 AM Thread Starter
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AC Installation in a GTV 2000 Part I - Centre Console Rebuild

The centre console was cracked badly at one end, this was repaired with fibre glass (badly I might add) and then sent off to be recovered with vinyl (more pictures of this rebuilt centre console to come). I was lucky and managed to source that hard to find Alfa badge for the console and a cigarette lighter.

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Last edited by WA-Alfa; 10-25-2010 at 07:43 AM.
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post #6 of 46 (permalink) Old 10-25-2010, 02:12 PM
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i'm curious how much does the old a/c complete setup cost?
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post #7 of 46 (permalink) Old 10-25-2010, 11:18 PM Thread Starter
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AC Installation in a GTV 2000 Part I - Trimming the console

Having trimmed the centre console to fit the Borletti Evaporator Box I sent this off to be recovered with vinyl. I sourced new veneers and trimmed these also. I replaced the gear gaiter with a new vinyl one from Classic Alfa and replaced the heater control console so that this new one had markings on it that were suitable for the AC model. The little plastic trim that goes around the veneer was sourced from Re-Originals. I had great difficulty fitting this and ended up cracking the veneer in the process. Oh well few things in this world ever end up perfect. The secret is to run it under hot water to soften it up and then bend the two sides wide open with the handle of a knife or fork so that it slides onto the edge of the veneer - I think one can afford to be a bit rough with it but do be gentle when sliding it onto the veneer.
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post #8 of 46 (permalink) Old 10-26-2010, 01:12 AM
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I have a few spare SD-508 compressors, let me know if you are interested
EDIT: just looking at your wiring diagram, I'm surprised that there's not a pressure switch incorporated somewhere on the high-side of the system to cut the compressor out if it's low on gas.

Last edited by sam the chemist; 10-26-2010 at 01:16 AM.
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post #9 of 46 (permalink) Old 10-26-2010, 02:41 AM Thread Starter
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Your referring to a binary switch which cuts off the compressor if internal
pressure exceeds safe limits and a low pressure switch that cuts the compressor off
when there is excessive refrigerant loss and a possible third function that engagaes an electric fan. Sure to all of these but the wiring diagram is only to explain how to wire the swithces in the original Evaporator Box -

BTW - How much for the SD-508, do they work, are the new or second hand, original or those ones made in China and last where do the tubes exit,
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post #10 of 46 (permalink) Old 10-26-2010, 03:07 AM
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Yep that's what I was thinking of
The compressors are second hand and have both fittings on the back face of the compressor
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post #11 of 46 (permalink) Old 10-27-2010, 06:53 PM
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Hi WA Alfa

Just found your thread.

It's giving me the impetus to get the AC in my 1973 Berlina running again. The system seems identical to the one in the US Berlina in an earlier thread. Mine seems complete except for the bracket to house the compressor.

Can you give any advice on costs?

Also, my fan is also disconnected and I'm not sure whether with AC the 2 speed switch for the fan is redundant and it just works through the AC system (which seems to have a 3 speed switch), or whether both swicthed are wired up (the 2 speed for when the AC is not on, and the AC switch for when it is).

Any advice on this would be appreciated.

Cheers

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post #12 of 46 (permalink) Old 10-28-2010, 05:46 AM Thread Starter
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Don,

I will have a look at giving you a list of the costs involved. I will say that sourcing the original parts probably cost around $1000.00 but I will have to do some sums. It's a very expensive process, and to convert a non AC car to have AC may cost inexcess of $3000-$4000 depending on how much work you do yourself.

I am not sure that I understand your question regarding the switches. The original Borletti Evaporator Boxes for the Berlina and the GTV will have had a 3-speed switch connected to a 12 volt blower. No further switches for the blower fan are required. The path of the air passes first through the evaporator,then through the heater core and then out through the vents into the cabin. Regardless of whether the AC is turned on or not, the air path does not change and the blower will operate both with and then independently of the AC thermastat switch as per my wiring diagram.
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post #13 of 46 (permalink) Old 10-28-2010, 08:00 AM Thread Starter
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Costing for Original Alfa parts

The items listed below consist of only the original components that I purchased to install an original Alfa AC kit in a non AC GTV, non original components such as the condensor and compressor will be purchased new.

Prices are in Australian dollars and do not include postage/shipping.

For some items the shipping cost (e.g., Borletti Evaporator Box) were quite prohibitive and at times exceed the cost of the item itself.

1. $150.00 - Borletti Evaporator Box
2. $175.00 - Compressor Bracket, including cylinder head bolts (this included dud engine pulley that was thrown away).
3. $290.00 - Double V belt engine pulley
4. $35.00 - Compressor bracket used to stabilise the compressor
5. $42.00 - Replace bushes on stabiliser bracket
6. $38.50 - Heater Control Trim for AC model
7. $7.00 - Air Conditioner decal for rear window
8. $100.00 - An old centre console
9. $170.00 - Recover Centre console with vinyl
10. $15.00 - Small Alfa badge for centre console
11. $77.50 - 1 gauge battery cables
12. $327.00 - Odyssey Battery PC925
13. $85.95 - Taylor 300 Series Battery Box
14. $275.00 - Flush evaporator and heater core, pressure test, expansion value, fit 12 volt blower motor, thermostat, fan blower switches
15. $40.00 - York to Sanden Cvompressor Adaptor plate
16. $80.00 - Parallel Flow (Superflow) Condenser (12x14)
17. $126.00 - 7 x 4 pin 30 amp relays with fuse
18. $189.00 - Radiator electric fan (12") and thermonstat
19. $40.00 - Condenser electric fan (10")
20. $500.00 - Sanden SD7H15 Compressor
21. $16.00 - Coolant 5 litres
22. $20.00 - Air cleaner
23. $500.00 - Sundries - Approximate cost (Thermostat, hose fittings, paint, nuts, bolts, connectors, terminals, wire, etc)

Total = $3,298.95 (this amount came as a bit of a shock and if I was a little less fussy this could have been done cheaper)

On reflection I think it's probably rather foolish to spend this amount on AC, but I'v enjoyed the process thus far. I've also spread the whole process out over 18 months and so it hasn't hurt as much finacially doing it this way.
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Last edited by WA-Alfa; 05-20-2011 at 09:47 AM. Reason: Updated costings
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post #14 of 46 (permalink) Old 11-03-2010, 06:29 AM
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Well done for giving it a go, I will be interested in hearing how it finally works in our horrible hot summers here in Perth.

I do not even have window tinting so driving it above 35deg is not an option.

Regards
Tim

Tim
1975 105 GTV 2000
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post #15 of 46 (permalink) Old 05-13-2011, 03:02 AM Thread Starter
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Ok I'm back at it after a long break.

Fixing the compressor to the engine represents a major (or the most troublesome) stumbling block to installing AC in the GTV. As shown in my previous posts I sourced an original compressor bracket for the GTV which was originally designed for a York compressor. I sourced a York to Sanden Compressor Adaptor Plate for $40.00 (part number: 2400) from Nostalgic Air (York Compressor Adapter Plate / Universal Mount - Miscellaneous Compressor Mounts). I then fitted this plate onto the engine/compressor bracket's face and spaced the two plates by 15 mm using 4 brass compression nuts from the tap fitting section of my local hardware store ($1.50 each). This spacing was necessary to ensure that the Adaptor Plate could clear the compressor stabilising bracket that attaches to a long steel bolt 'pin' under the alternator. The plates were secured using high tensile bolts and the compressor aligned with the pulley and tensioner. It helps to get someone to hold the compressor for you while you attach it - thanks Neil! The entire compressor mounting bracket, stabilizing bracket, adapting plate, nuts and washers weighed 6.1 kg. The weight of the Sanden SD7H15 Compressor was 6.9kg. The inside distance between the compressor's 'ears' was 83.3 mm. Technical details about the compressor are available from the Sanden website in their 'SD Compressor Service guide'. The SD7H15 has an output of 154CC or 9.36CID and is recommended by Nostalgic Air over the 508 model. It has 7 pistons (compared to 5 for the 508 model) and apparently vibrates less.

Last, the compressor was earthed to the chassis.

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Last edited by WA-Alfa; 05-15-2011 at 12:51 PM.
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