Education needed (please) - Alfa Romeo Bulletin Board & Forums
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-19-2019, 12:30 AM Thread Starter
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Education needed (please)

Hi all from Italy.
I'm not 100% new to the forum, having posted years ago on a Can-Am thread.
but I'm now writing for a different reason after several years.

I'm currently thinking about buying an Alfa 2000 GTV. I have two other classics (a Fulvia Rallye 1.6 HF and a Maserati 2.24V) so I'm not entirely new to classic cars' traps and pitfalls and I can do some work myself - but not serious body work. The Maserati was an impulsive buy, but I knew I had a donor car in case... and it proved priceless, so I don't want to make the same mistake twice as I've run out of donors

What I'm looking for is a good driver, to take care of and improve over the years, and enjoy quite often. Not a shelf or concourse queen, that, incidentally, I wouldn't be financially prepared to pay for with the current prices.. But I don't want to end up with a bag of corroded iron dust either
To give an idea the 2.24V has put on 11K chilometers in two years, so I want something I can use rather often.

I need to learn the differences between the various years of production, and what to look for in order to avoid unforeseen troubles (there will be plenty anyway, I know).
Can you point me to any threads or articles that I can read to learn a bit about the differences between a 1969 and, say, a 1975 version?

Any advice is appeciated also about 'what to look for' to avoid bad surprises - I've witnessed in person Buick Rivieras of 1965 being fraudolently made up to look like GS version, so... I don't know if this is the case with some Alfa Romeo. Any advice is welcome.
Thank you
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-20-2019, 07:01 AM
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Maurizio, Welcome to the AlfaBB! You've asked a pretty broad question, that is hard to answer in a single post. I'm not surprised that no one has jumped in yet to try to answer it... not that this community isn't helpful... it truly is... There is abundant information already out there to answer your question... in books, on the web and on this site. For example, a quick search offers these useful tidbits:

https://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/gt-...-purchase.html

https://www.tradeuniquecars.com.au/b...s-buyers-guide

https://www.amazon.com/Alfa-Romeo-Gi.../dp/1904788696

So search away on this site and you'll find most of your questions answered. If not, then come back with more specific questions. Besides, this group loves a challenge and likes to banter about all sorts of nit-picky details and how-to's for the DIYers.

Ken
'73 GTV
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-20-2019, 08:13 AM
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GTV--- It's all about BODY/chassis and missing trim... Find the cleanest rust free one and preferably one that wasn't just painted in the last six months. My rule #1 is never buy a car that has just been painted. A seller would ALWAYS take short-cuts in a situation like that if he had no intention to keep it. Cars like this show up all the time in Italy. Usually they are side jobs, body shops do to flip and usually they are loaded with bondo and have very little attention to other details except perhaps seat covers which they usually do a good job at.

Scalino's in any form are nice and pure and a little pricey. I'd stick to carburetor versions. I'm not sure how prolific the SPICA was there toward the end of the run of GTV's..

After the above.. mechanicals are simple.
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-20-2019, 04:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by divotandtralee View Post
GTV--- It's all about BODY/chassis and missing trim... Find the cleanest rust free one and preferably one that wasn't just painted in the last six months. My rule #1 is never buy a car that has just been painted. A seller would ALWAYS take short-cuts in a situation like that if he had no intention to keep it. Cars like this show up all the time in Italy. Usually they are side jobs, body shops do to flip and usually they are loaded with bondo and have very little attention to other details except perhaps seat covers which they usually do a good job at.
Ciao Maurizio -

I recently spent 3 years in bella Napoli. While I was there, I purchased a 72 GT Junior outside Naples. I looked at several cars while I was searching for a suitable one, and I can tell you that the above advice is very, very good.

I saw numerous cars with shiny paint over very, very bad bodywork. Those are the worst, in my opinion -- you pay extra for shiny paint, and then you pay a LOT more to fix what was done poorly the first time.

When I inspected my car, I was quite happy to see faded paint, original rockers, and small holes in the floorboards -- that indicated to me that the car had not had any metal work done in the past.

If you are interested in a shop to do some work at a very reasonable price, I can recommend one. They are about 50 km north of Napoli.

EDIT: I forgot to mention the GT Junior versus the GTV. The 1300cc GT Junior is going to be much more affordable and much more common than the GTV because of the additional tax on the 2L cars. If it is possible, I would suggest purchasing a GT Junior and fitting a 2L engine. The Guardia di Financia won't be able to tell the difference...

Ciao,

Scott

72 GTV; 66 Fairlane GT convt, 428, 4 sp; 68 GTO Convt, owner built 455 and TH400; 71 Javelin road race project, owner built 401, T10
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-20-2019, 05:22 PM
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Originally Posted by bulletpruf View Post
Ciao Maurizio -

I recently spent 3 years in bella Napoli. While I was there, I purchased a 72 GT Junior outside Naples. I looked at several cars while I was searching for a suitable one, and I can tell you that the above advice is very, very good.

I saw numerous cars with shiny paint over very, very bad bodywork. Those are the worst, in my opinion -- you pay extra for shiny paint, and then you pay a LOT more to fix what was done poorly the first time.

When I inspected my car, I was quite happy to see faded paint, original rockers, and small holes in the floorboards -- that indicated to me that the car had not had any metal work done in the past.

If you are interested in a shop to do some work at a very reasonable price, I can recommend one. They are about 50 km north of Napoli.

EDIT: I forgot to mention the GT Junior versus the GTV. The 1300cc GT Junior is going to be much more affordable and much more common than the GTV because of the additional tax on the 2L cars. If it is possible, I would suggest purchasing a GT Junior and fitting a 2L engine. The Guardia di Financia won't be able to tell the difference...

Ciao,

Scott
Scott, I bought my '69 Guiia Junior Gt .. It was from the Florence area and was inspected by a guy from NE. It was perfect in every way and was not advertised.. Cars can be had but you need to be alert as to how these cars come to market. I was fortunate to buy a Fulvia by a reputable shop in Trieste.. He had all the before and after photos and was a shop that moon-lighted on flips but he did it right because he had a passion for the process. It's one of the only cars I ever bought with 1 year old paint job because i had faith it what he did. Not all are bondo queens but most are in it for the quick sale. Neither of these cars had excuses and today they are very difficult to find in the condition I describe. There were NO tell-tale signs on these cars they were ever repainted. In most cases, even dealer cars over there, it is lipstick on a pig as you so well stated.
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Last edited by divotandtralee; 09-20-2019 at 05:28 PM.
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-20-2019, 08:33 PM
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The best advice I can give you is to simply buy the best car you can find. You'll of course have to pay a premium for such a car, but what you'll be buying will be well worth it in the long run.

By "best" I'm talking about a car that is rust and accident free and in sound original cosmetic and mechanical condition. These are admittedly hard to find but, since you are in Italy, you'll have a larger group of cars to consider . . . I bought my Super out of NL ten years ago and my friend who looked at it for me said it was the best Super he's seen. It was, and is, completely rust-free despite spending a long time in Germany and Holland. It was never hit and even the paint was, mostly anyway, original and glossy. The interior had been redone but in period correct materials. On the way to the docks, it blew a head gasket. When I pulled the head here in Texas it was still on it's original 37 year old gasket. You have to turn over a lot of rocks to find a car like this but, unless you want to do a restoration or drive a car that still needs a lot of work, the search is worth the effort.

Since you have a Fulvia snd a Maserati you won't find working on an Alfa difficult at all. Personally, I find that all the post-war Italian engine designs have a comfortable familiarity about them that makes working on the pretty easy. Italian engines of this period, whether Alfa or Ferrari, just make sense to me. Good luck in your search. And keep us posted!

Jim . . . '72 Super 1300, '70, 1750GTV, 2nd series,
'62, Lancia Flaminia Zagato3c, 2nd series
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-20-2019, 11:55 PM
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I saw a step nose GTV undergoing extensive panel replacement. I use this body shop to restore six Alfa Romeo bodies and could not believe that someone would spend $25K to repair this GTV. The amount of rusted out panels that needed replacement was very extensive and asked the shop why the owner wanted to repair the body. The shop owner said that the owner was an eye doctor and wanted it done. I would never recommend buying any GTV unless it was properly repaired or you are a skilled metal fabricator and can fix anything.

I sold a running 1969 GTV for $2.5K and it probably needed $20K or more to repair the rust damage.
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-21-2019, 12:53 AM Thread Starter
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Gentlemen
thank you very much for the advice and information.
Not unsurprisingly, the advice on the body condition coincides with what the guys that run the body shop I trust my cars to, are telling me: stay away from any GTVs that need panel work as it is a can of costly worms. They do quite a lot of historics, and they are currently working on a Montreal rebuilt with the old solder technique. It was a pleasure to see it done.

Yes, mechanic does not scare me as I can do some and have a friend I exchange work with (I do some electronics for him and he does mechanics for me).

I was looking at a car that is being auctioned off in the UK as we speak (I still cannot post links but it is Lot 172 1974 Alfa Romeo 2000 GTV auctioned off at Historics in Brooklands ) but I was scared by the black painted engine compartment. As far as I know the engine should carry the same colour of the body and painting it black is a sign of a quick cosmetic job.

I will keep looking and will keep you informed.
Thanks!

Last edited by MaurizioFerrari; 09-21-2019 at 12:53 AM. Reason: spelling mistake
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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-21-2019, 07:07 AM
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Maurizio I know of two good cars available here in the US, a 71 GTJr. with a 2.0 and a 74 GTV.
Contact me directly if interested.

Joe
[email protected]
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