1972 GT Junior "Restoration" -- Naples, Italy - Alfa Romeo Bulletin Board & Forums
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post #1 of 313 (permalink) Old 10-26-2015, 10:01 PM Thread Starter
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1972 GT Junior "Restoration" -- Naples, Italy

Fellas -

I just started disassembly of the 1972 Alfa Romeo GT Junior that I recently purchased. Plan is to completely restore it in my garage here in Naples, Italy. I will have to farm out the machine work on the engine, but plan to do the rest myself.



IMG_3894_zpsitb478ap.jpg Photo by sd_walters | Photobucket



I considered a number of different cars, but chose the smooth nose GT Junior because they are relatively plentiful, affordable (I paid $13,500 for mine - running and driving), outstanding aftermarket support, lightweight, and they have beautiful lines. I also think they look great in "track day" configuration.







As mentioned above, I will restore the car, but I use "restore" loosely -- the finished car will have a number of modifications to improve performance. I plan to completely update the front and rear suspension, change the 1300 cc engine for a 2000 cc engine of the same vintage, get rid of the rear seat, add a roll cage, use a four headlight grille, etc. The goal is to have street legal car that I'll use for track days.

The body will need some attention; it has some rust in the usual areas -- floors, rear glass, rockers, etc. However, the floors and rockers are original, and it does not appear to have had significant accident damage in the past, so I have a pretty good foundation to start with. This will be my first time installing patch panels, floor pans, etc, so I will need some assistance from the audience.

I have a pretty good selection of tools, but I'm always looking for excuses to buy more, so feel free to recommend anything that might make the job easier.

My timeline could be pretty tight -- I'm active duty military, and am scheduled to depart Italy in summer of 2018, but there's a decent chance I could leave in summer of 2017. Regardless of when I leave, I plan to take the car back to the states with me. If I have to put it in a shipping container, in pieces, so be it.

For more background information on the car and the search for it, see this thread: http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/othe...mborghini.html and this one: http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/gt-1...gtv-italy.html

For more information on my garage, details are here: Scott's 2+ Car Garage in Naples, Italy - The Garage Journal Board

Scott

72 GTV; 66 Fairlane GT convt, 428, 4 sp; 68 GTO Convt, owner built 455 and TH400; 71 Javelin road race project, owner built 401, T10
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post #2 of 313 (permalink) Old 11-16-2015, 01:10 AM Thread Starter
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Progress has been slow because I'm setting up my garage. My tools just arrived from the U.S., just got my compressor wired (Quincy 80 gallon), had some more lights and outlets installed in the garage, etc.

A few questions --

1. How do you get the front and rear glass out? I need to remove the trim first, I guess, but I don't know how it's attached or what tools you use to release it. Any tips?

2. I have a few spot weld cutters. Curious to know whether you can remove outer sills, patch them, and reinstall? Don't know if you normally booger these up when you remove them or if some folks remove, repair, and reinstall the original outer sills.

3. What specialty tools will I need for disassembly? Just looking for details on Alfa specific tools. I already bought Ribe bolt sockets. Anything else?

4. Any thoughts on order of disassembly? I have the seats and carpet out. Figure the next step is to remove exterior trim, grille, bumpers, lights, glass, etc. Then finish the interior, removing dash and headliner. Then engine and transmission out. And then front and rear suspension out. Then remove the front clip? And onto a dolly or rotisserie. Strip paint, followed by cutting out bad metal and replacing with new.

Will follow up soon with more pictures.

Thanks!

Scott

72 GTV; 66 Fairlane GT convt, 428, 4 sp; 68 GTO Convt, owner built 455 and TH400; 71 Javelin road race project, owner built 401, T10
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post #3 of 313 (permalink) Old 11-16-2015, 06:22 AM
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Only way to remove front clip is to cut it off. I wouldn't suggest doing that unless really really really rusty. I used a razor blade to cut out the old seals when removing gasketed glass (done it this way in many cars). Unlikely to reuse the old seals and new ones are cheap for the alfa.
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post #4 of 313 (permalink) Old 11-16-2015, 09:30 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mb230s View Post
Only way to remove front clip is to cut it off. I wouldn't suggest doing that unless really really really rusty. I used a razor blade to cut out the old seals when removing gasketed glass (done it this way in many cars). Unlikely to reuse the old seals and new ones are cheap for the alfa.
Thanks for the response. Do you need to remove the stainless trim or do you just cut the seal to remove the glass?

Thanks,

Scott

72 GTV; 66 Fairlane GT convt, 428, 4 sp; 68 GTO Convt, owner built 455 and TH400; 71 Javelin road race project, owner built 401, T10
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post #5 of 313 (permalink) Old 11-16-2015, 09:58 AM
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I cut first. Sometimes I've removed as one unit with cut seal, sometimes the trim comes off then I remove the glass. Just kinda depends on the seal and trim style. I cut the rubber to try and minimize any risk of damage to the trim.
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post #6 of 313 (permalink) Old 11-16-2015, 11:15 PM Thread Starter
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I cut first. Sometimes I've removed as one unit with cut seal, sometimes the trim comes off then I remove the glass. Just kinda depends on the seal and trim style. I cut the rubber to try and minimize any risk of damage to the trim.
Ok, thanks. I made some progress on the back glass this morning. It was releasing in some spots, but I couldn't get it completed before it was time to leave for work.

Thanks,

Scott

72 GTV; 66 Fairlane GT convt, 428, 4 sp; 68 GTO Convt, owner built 455 and TH400; 71 Javelin road race project, owner built 401, T10
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post #7 of 313 (permalink) Old 11-16-2015, 11:18 PM Thread Starter
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1. Another question -- one of my front jack pads is boogered up and will need to be replaced. I plan to put the body on a dolly made from 4 x 4 lumber. I believe these normally mount on the jack pads. If so, should I replace the floors and jack pads before I put it on the dolly?

Other questions -- anyone have any thoughts?

2. I have a few spot weld cutters. Curious to know whether you can remove outer sills, patch them, and reinstall? Don't know if you normally booger these up when you remove them or if some folks remove, repair, and reinstall the original outer sills.

3. What specialty tools will I need for disassembly? Just looking for details on Alfa specific tools. I already bought Ribe bolt sockets. Anything else?

4. Any thoughts on order of disassembly? I have the seats and carpet out. Figure the next step is to remove exterior trim, grille, bumpers, lights, glass, etc. Then finish the interior, removing dash and headliner. Then engine and transmission out. And then front and rear suspension out. Then remove the front clip? And onto a dolly or rotisserie. Strip paint, followed by cutting out bad metal and replacing with new.

Thanks!

Scott

72 GTV; 66 Fairlane GT convt, 428, 4 sp; 68 GTO Convt, owner built 455 and TH400; 71 Javelin road race project, owner built 401, T10
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post #8 of 313 (permalink) Old 11-17-2015, 07:11 AM Thread Starter
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Ok, thanks. I made some progress on the back glass this morning. It was releasing in some spots, but I couldn't get it completed before it was time to leave for work.

Thanks,

Scott
Got front and back glass out during my lunch break (I only live about 3/4 of a mile from the office, so I'm often home for lunch). Once I figured out how to attack it, it was simple. Now I have to find a safe place to put the glass for a while.

Metal looked very nice in the front window channels; back isn't perfect, but appears to just have a few isolated spots that will need work. I'll know more when I get the paint and bondo off.

Almost forgot -- how common is a rear defrost glass on these cars? Mine has it.

Scott

72 GTV; 66 Fairlane GT convt, 428, 4 sp; 68 GTO Convt, owner built 455 and TH400; 71 Javelin road race project, owner built 401, T10
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post #9 of 313 (permalink) Old 11-17-2015, 07:11 AM
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Garage
Bravo!

GT1300Juinio
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post #10 of 313 (permalink) Old 11-17-2015, 11:39 PM
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Glass: Leave trim IN!!!!!
Use a handful of flatblade screwdrivers, and go in the car. Pop the screwdrivers in between body and rubber. All around. Say every 10 cm. The rubber will be off the body then. Then you can easily pop out the widow complete. Then store complete. Do NOT remove the trim as it is very soft, will bend VERY easy and is nearly impossible to get it back into the exact shape as it came off the car. I store the glass complete with rubber and trim until reinstallation time.
If the rubber is ok and still soft just clean and re use. If not buy new.
Removing trim in that case:
Carefully remove glass from rubber AND trim.
Then remove rubber from trim, and NOT trim from rubber.
Refitting: fit rubber to glass. Use lots of WD40 or so, and fit trim with glass in situ. Then , using a small cord, fit the complete unit in one. 15 minutes of work.
All later GT's from say 73 on have rear window heating. Check if it works by misting it up, and powering the leads. Nearly impossible to repair, and totally impossible to repair once installed.


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post #11 of 313 (permalink) Old 11-17-2015, 11:43 PM
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also.
Removing sills and refitting?

you clearly have homework to do.
I'd suggest you google up Vintage Customs and check out some videos. This is not a job for just anyone. Also, with maybe 120 a piece for a very good fitting sill, why even bother?

Front clip, or lower front panel: Easy. and a very good one to replace as there is always rust underneath. Also cheap and very good fit.
Try alfa-service.com.


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post #12 of 313 (permalink) Old 11-18-2015, 10:49 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Berlinista View Post
Glass: Leave trim IN!!!!!
Use a handful of flatblade screwdrivers, and go in the car. Pop the screwdrivers in between body and rubber. All around. Say every 10 cm. The rubber will be off the body then. Then you can easily pop out the widow complete. Then store complete. Do NOT remove the trim as it is very soft, will bend VERY easy and is nearly impossible to get it back into the exact shape as it came off the car. I store the glass complete with rubber and trim until reinstallation time.
If the rubber is ok and still soft just clean and re use. If not buy new.
Removing trim in that case:
Carefully remove glass from rubber AND trim.
Then remove rubber from trim, and NOT trim from rubber.
Refitting: fit rubber to glass. Use lots of WD40 or so, and fit trim with glass in situ. Then , using a small cord, fit the complete unit in one. 15 minutes of work.
All later GT's from say 73 on have rear window heating. Check if it works by misting it up, and powering the leads. Nearly impossible to repair, and totally impossible to repair once installed.
Thanks for the details. Got it done without any problems.

Scott

72 GTV; 66 Fairlane GT convt, 428, 4 sp; 68 GTO Convt, owner built 455 and TH400; 71 Javelin road race project, owner built 401, T10
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post #13 of 313 (permalink) Old 11-18-2015, 10:51 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Berlinista View Post
also.
Removing sills and refitting?

you clearly have homework to do.
I'd suggest you google up Vintage Customs and check out some videos. This is not a job for just anyone. Also, with maybe 120 a piece for a very good fitting sill, why even bother?

Front clip, or lower front panel: Easy. and a very good one to replace as there is always rust underneath. Also cheap and very good fit.
Try alfa-service.com.
I spent some time reviewing Vintage Customs videos, but it's been a few months. I'll check again.

$120 isn't a problem, but I'd like to save the original sills if I can. That way I won't have any issues with fit.

Thanks

Scott

72 GTV; 66 Fairlane GT convt, 428, 4 sp; 68 GTO Convt, owner built 455 and TH400; 71 Javelin road race project, owner built 401, T10
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post #14 of 313 (permalink) Old 11-18-2015, 11:43 AM
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Quote:
Do NOT remove the trim as it is very soft, will bend VERY easy and is nearly impossible to get it back into the exact shape as it came off the car. I store the glass complete with rubber and trim until reinstallation time.



If there is one piece of absolutely essential information that every Alfisti should have committed to memory this is it. Thanks for this, Rik!

Jim . . . '72 Super 1300, '70, 1750GTV, 2nd series,
'62, Lancia Flaminia Zagato3c, 2nd series
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post #15 of 313 (permalink) Old 11-19-2015, 12:57 PM Thread Starter
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Got a bit more work done. It's slow going, because I'm focused on getting my garage in order, and that's a work in progress.

I pulled the front and back glass out a few days ago. Unlike a large American car, you can easily handle this yourself.





Also did some picking at the car where the bondo was thick, paint bubbling, etc. Here's the base of the driver's side C (B?) pillar.



Decklid. Ouch.



Back glass - driver's side, bottom.



Really doesn't look very bad at this point.

Scott

72 GTV; 66 Fairlane GT convt, 428, 4 sp; 68 GTO Convt, owner built 455 and TH400; 71 Javelin road race project, owner built 401, T10
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