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post #1 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-29-2019, 03:24 PM Thread Starter
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Replacement tires Quad

I got a question from one of our School students about replacement tires for his '18 Quad.
Any thoughts???
Seems he got carried away with the skid pad last weekend.
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post #2 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-29-2019, 04:11 PM
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A number of people have had great luck with the Michelin Pilot Sport 4S (PS4S).

We've used those on our Quadrifoglio in a slightly upsized 255 and 295 width combo for a couple of years. They grip well, are less temperature-sensitive than the OEM PZero Corsas, and wear really well.
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post #3 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-29-2019, 05:43 PM Thread Starter
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Edit: 2 Alfa Giulias need new tires

I had to leave our School early and missed the 2nd day when cars seem to wear out their tires more than Saturday.
So I heard another Giulia Quad owner has the same tire affliction.
We wet down the skid pad Sunday morning but it is dry in the afternoon. The students do a gymkhana/go-cart track that opens up to the skid pad with a sweeping turn that tightens up just before they go back to the go-cart track. In the dry, with new confidence front tires get sacrificed.
I will pass this thread on to him. The first one has joined AROC and appreciates alfabb.com already.

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post #4 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-29-2019, 07:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeCab View Post
A number of people have had great luck with the Michelin Pilot Sport 4S (PS4S).

We've used those on our Quadrifoglio in a slightly upsized 255 and 295 width combo for a couple of years. They grip well, are less temperature-sensitive than the OEM PZero Corsas, and wear really well.
I'd go with Michelin PS4S as well.


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post #5 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-30-2019, 12:52 AM
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As per above, PS4S are recommended. They don't make the rear tires in the OEM size, 285/30/19, hence the need to upsize to 295/30/19. Fronts are available in the 245/35/19 size, but if you want the same rolling diameter at the front as with the upsized rears, then 255/35/19 can be used.

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post #6 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-30-2019, 06:59 AM
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Try the Michelin pilot Super Sport 245/35/19 and 285/30/19 available

4S might be slightly better but I know these will do just as well.



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post #7 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-30-2019, 08:48 AM
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thank you

Thank you for the great help. I am that carried away student that Paul mentioned. Seems the Michelin PS4S are the best option. Any thoughts about the 'standard' (non Corsa) Pirelli P Zero? Are they good?

Nicholas

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post #8 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-30-2019, 09:05 AM
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Thank you for the great help. I am that carried away student that Paul mentioned. Seems the Michelin PS4S are the best option. Any thoughts about the 'standard' (non Corsa) Pirelli P Zero? Are they good?

Nicholas
Everyone raves about the PS4S, frankly wouldn't bother with the standard P Zero, the Corsa are fantastic in a rather limited window of usage (dry and warm), the P Zero would be a compromise bettered by the PS4S.

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post #9 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-30-2019, 09:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeCab View Post
A number of people have had great luck with the Michelin Pilot Sport 4S (PS4S).

We've used those on our Quadrifoglio in a slightly upsized 255 and 295 width combo for a couple of years. They grip well, are less temperature-sensitive than the OEM PZero Corsas, and wear really well.
I recently did the same on mine---the upsized PS4S. Dry grip at the limit is slightly less, but in all other conditions, they are good. My OEM set only lasted 10k miles, so hopefully these will give me a bit more tire life.

I am tempted to go back, however. I'd be curious about tire life from people who have replaced the OEM with the same--often the "new car" compound is a little different than the replacement of the same tire, and the replacements will last longer.

Has anyone replaced their Quad tires with the OEM-type, and had enough experience to tell us how long they last?

Stacy Faught -- Alfas: 1983 GTV-6 (3.5l), 2018 Giulia Quadrifoglio. Non-Alfas: 1991 Corvette ZR-1 (500+hp Haibeck-built 32v 5.7l)
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post #10 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-30-2019, 03:37 PM
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I recently did the same on mine---the upsized PS4S. Dry grip at the limit is slightly less, but in all other conditions, they are good. My OEM set only lasted 10k miles, so hopefully these will give me a bit more tire life.

I am tempted to go back, however. I'd be curious about tire life from people who have replaced the OEM with the same--often the "new car" compound is a little different than the replacement of the same tire, and the replacements will last longer.

Has anyone replaced their Quad tires with the OEM-type, and had enough experience to tell us how long they last?
I can get them but they are limited stock right now. Roughly $294 each for front and $345 each for rears. There is a enough to make a set if anyone is interested. Ciao!

BTW that tire has a 60 AAA tire wear. 60!! lol


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post #11 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-31-2019, 07:45 AM
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Don't overlook the latest ultra high performance all season tires. I have a set of Pirelli PZero A/S plus on my Jaguar XF and a set of Michelin Pilot A/S 3 on my supercharged Subaru BRZ. Michelin's current offering is the Pilot A/S 3 +.

These tires now offer 90%+ of the performance of a full summer tire of the same category. They perform much better than the summer version at temperatures below about 50 F or in the wet. They give adequate grip in below freezing temperatures and in light snow or rough or gritted ice.

These new generation all season tires are essentially the equal of ten year old ultra high performance summer tires like the PZero Nero or the PS2. They deliver better performance than those tires in most road driving circumstances.

Oh, and they drift more easily with less heat and wear......

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post #12 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-31-2019, 11:56 PM
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Don't overlook the latest ultra high performance all season tires. I have a set of Pirelli PZero A/S plus on my Jaguar XF and a set of Michelin Pilot A/S 3 on my supercharged Subaru BRZ. Michelin's current offering is the Pilot A/S 3 +.

These tires now offer 90%+ of the performance of a full summer tire of the same category. They perform much better than the summer version at temperatures below about 50 F or in the wet. They give adequate grip in below freezing temperatures and in light snow or rough or gritted ice.

These new generation all season tires are essentially the equal of ten year old ultra high performance summer tires like the PZero Nero or the PS2. They deliver better performance than those tires in most road driving circumstances.

Oh, and they drift more easily with less heat and wear......
For those not wanting to have the hassle of swapping between summer and winter tires, or have the expense of that, yes UHP all seasons may be a compromise, but it is just that. UHP summer and UHP winter tires are just better, and for a car blessed with the chassis and steering of the Giulia I personally would find it a shame to dull those qualities.

For the record, I run the OEM Corsas in summer, will swap to PS4S when they are to be replaced, and Michelin Alpin 4 in winter, on dedicated wheels. Takes me 10 minutes at home to swap them over.
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post #13 of 30 (permalink) Old 02-01-2019, 05:53 AM
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I had the pilot A/S 3 (on a 05' audi allroad) and will say they are great. Not the best in the snow though. I did not feel too confident with them. I don't really recommend the A/S tires on the giulia. I have the P7 run flats on my Q4 right now I cannot wait to get rid of them for the PS4S'ssss.

I rather swap out as well. I usually always use Michelin for summer tires as well as Goodyear F1 Assy. If I had a A/S tire on the giulia it might be Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06. then Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3+.

Typically with A/S tires you also get a slimmer width and taller sidewall (depends on brand).

Although the Michelin stay very close, some others will give you a slimmer width.
225/40/19
26.1, 7.9, 9.1- A/S
26.1, 8.1, 9.1 PS4S

I am still on the side that the new A/S tires are great but it's still really hard to beat a full summer tire. Especially on such a high performance car like the giulia Quad or even the 2.0L. If you don't drive it hard and don't care to change out, A/S tires are fine for you. If you don't plan on seeing snow/ice go for summer. PS4S is great in wet weather too.


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post #14 of 30 (permalink) Old 02-01-2019, 06:35 AM
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If you get continuous periods of snow on your local roads then you need to fit winter tires.

However, I can attest to the fact that current ultra high performance all season tires are not a compromise choice for use as a summer tire. All season tires used to be demonstrably inferior to summer tires for use in ambient temperatures above 50F (8C). That is no longer the case.

When the steel belted radial first became commonly available in North America I enthusiastically fitted a set, Michelin ZX in 12 in size for a Toyota Corolla 1200 cc. They were far better in winter than any bias ply winter tire then available. They were, in effect, all season tires. Then came the winter radial followed closely by the ice radial (Metzler Blues, remember those? With blue tread because no carbon black in those silica based natural rubber intensive super sticky ice tire) which instantly pushed the summer radial back to summer only use. My first set of winter radials was the now famous Continental Contact, black tread but studless high silica content ice rubber. I still fit Continental ExtremeWinter Contacts to one of our cars (the Mini). Still a world leader in studless winter grip.

However, the current crop of all season tires is a substantial advance over those early radials up to such tires of even five years ago. Michelin has finally released their amazing Crossclimate for example. Not much compromise there and it's just a grand touring class tire. Pirelli P7 is head and shoulders above the same class of summer tire five years older. The PZero A/S plus is simply amazing as is the Michelin Pilot version of the same UHP all season.

For most serious drivers you will have much more fun, driver satisfaction, driving on a set of these UHP all seasons than on the latest ultra or max performance summer tires. Most of us enjoy driving close to traction limits occasionally when traffic permits. You can do that more often on these UHP all season tires than you can on the very grippiest street tires you could use.

First off the all season will deliver most of its capabilities right from cold. The summer tires wil only deliver peak performance once you get them hot. All season work better in the cold, especially rainy cold. Below about 15C (60F approx) the all season beats the summer tire in my experience. Once you get below 8C there will be no contest.

My main point is that current top level all season tires have recaptured the all around performance of the early steel belted radial, in those days you used winter tires only in really rugged conditions. All season tires are now capable year round apart from really rugged conditions.

PS Up here we are amused to view your weather reporting about the effects of the recent Alberta Clipper, producing cold temperatures down to -27F. These are absolutely normal winter temperatures for us, expecting -29C Sunday night as we finally get dragged into the Arctic vortex by the tail end of the Clipper. Our friends in Minnesota, the Dakotas and Montana are doubtless also amused at the widespread consternation of their fellow Americans now also enjoying normal winter temperatures. Flagstaff must get pretty cold on occasion given the seriously high elevation. I live at 3,500 ft and even I found Flagstaff pretty breathtaking, even in high summer. Very pretty city.

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post #15 of 30 (permalink) Old 02-01-2019, 06:52 AM
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For those not wanting to have the hassle of swapping between summer and winter tires, or have the expense of that, yes UHP all seasons may be a compromise, but it is just that. UHP summer and UHP winter tires are just better, and for a car blessed with the chassis and steering of the Giulia I personally would find it a shame to dull those qualities.

For the record, I run the OEM Corsas in summer, will swap to PS4S when they are to be replaced, and Michelin Alpin 4 in winter, on dedicated wheels. Takes me 10 minutes at home to swap them over.
I'm using winter tires for winter. Believe me I really know about rugged winter conditions. In the past I've driven on summer tires quite securely in winter conditions far more challenging than anything you'd get in Belgium but never on high performance summer tires. That's not possible even though people try, it's very, very dangerous. Ironically the least experienced winter drivers are the ones who get snow so seldom they are the most likely to find themselves trying to drive on the wrong tires in winter conditions.

I suggest that driving enjoyment is actually enhanced by fitting UHP all season tires. In my experience and judgment a set of tires does not change the way a car handles, only the maximum grip. A well designed chassis drives the same way on any set of tires. Because I drive for half EVERY year on snow tires I know this to be true. I usually fit a set of high performance snow tires to get better bare road performance than you get with studless winter tires. However, for my twitchy little supercharged Subaru BRZ I gave up and fit studless winter tires precisely because the tire type has no effect on chassis balance. I give up bare road grip, extremely reluctantly, in order to be able to drive away from the curb in deep snow or on ice. That little Subaru just loves to spin up its rear tires and that was before I fitted an Edelbrock Eaton TVS supercharger (same size as the one fitted to my 3.0 litre Jaguar!!!). Chassis "balance" is exactly the same but of course the grip limits are lower, much lower though still better than the long ago discarded stock Michelin Primacy summer tires.

Be careful not to over tire your car if you really enjoy road driving.

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