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post #76 of 106 (permalink) Old 10-20-2010, 09:53 PM
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Ok...I have just a small problem, and 1 or 2 questions. I hope someone could help me:

I now have a `NO-GAS` MIG welder. If I use the NO-GAS option and use the flux-core wire, it still burns right through the metal. If I weld onto 5mm thick metal, it just `bounces` off. Should I rather opt for the gas, and normal wire?? Will the GAS option still burn really hot and burn through the metal??
I have tried every setting on the NO-GAS option, but I have not had any joy. I am using 0.8mm wire. I tried going slow, fast, high setting, low setting, etc. I made sure the metal was clean, with a grinder. Can anybody help me out, or at least let me know how to do it, or should I just use the GAS option?

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post #77 of 106 (permalink) Old 10-20-2010, 11:00 PM
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Or should I just get myself an Inverter Welder?? Does anybody work with those? I have heard it is the easiest to use. You can use gas, or use it as an Arc Welder. I need to do my homework, but I am very eager to start fitting the panels on the car.

1 x Alfa Romeo Giulia GT 1600 1966 Stepnose Project.
1 x Alfa Romeo GT Junior 1600 1973 Non-stepnose Project. Ford F100 1977 Sold.
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post #78 of 106 (permalink) Old 10-21-2010, 01:39 AM
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the bouncing off means u have too much wire speed
Get an argon mixture gas set the right pressure, the gas has a cooling effect but most importantly let's oxygen out of the mixture when the metal melts thus producing a more powerful bond, when u r welding panels cut a small rusted piece -measure it's thickness , get some sheets with same thickness and adjust the settings practicing on them , the panels need the lowest settings and spotwelding tecqunique not continuous runs, have compressed air around and cool the spot after each weld , be patient and don't overdo it with the stuff cause u got to grind it afterwards...don't weld with yr garage doors closed fumes are poisonous and if u weld galvanized steel DEADLY , take all the safety precautions to the letter , gloves , mask the whole nine yards.
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post #79 of 106 (permalink) Old 10-24-2010, 01:04 PM
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It certainly is recommended that you practise first on the same thickness metal you are going to be welding so that you can adjust your welder to the correct settings and get your technique right. Go to a local panel beater or local sheet metal engineer and ask to get metal from the scrap bin.
From what you have indicated it does sound as though wire feed is a bit quick and current turned up too much plus hand technique not quite there yet. People think welding is easy but to a newcomer it can be difficult to first of all come to the right settings and secondly gain the coordination required to move the handpiece correctly. Gas shielding especially for a beginner does make it a bit easier too. Just keep at it and experiment with your machine-we amateurs all went through the same thing when we started. The cheaper machines though are harder to start with as they lack the fine setting choice and certainly my welding improved when I bought a better welder than the Ryobi (Deca 260E) I started with. The new is digitally controlled and able to be turned right down to 15a,has a greater duty cycle, plus has far greater wire speed choice, and far better handpiece so quality of welding, the speed work is done and the satisfaction is far greater than before.

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post #80 of 106 (permalink) Old 10-24-2010, 02:55 PM
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my setup

here is my setup right next to my soon to be extremely lightened and de- rusted racing project car
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post #81 of 106 (permalink) Old 10-24-2010, 09:31 PM
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Well, I have been practicing on the different machines. I have figured out one of the biggest problems which not many people tell you about. Over here in South Africa, standard extension leads (cables) can only carry a maximum of 16amps. The MIG welder uses at least 17amps. So what I have done was to purchase a 20amp extension lead. It works much better, as the energy flows through better. I even used my standard ARC welder (with the 20amp extension lead) on the car. It actually worked too. Still burns a bit hot, but to `spot` weld, it works. But I still need alot of practice with the MIG. But I will update my progress. I appreciate all the help on the BB. I am learning very quick here.

1 x Alfa Romeo Giulia GT 1600 1966 Stepnose Project.
1 x Alfa Romeo GT Junior 1600 1973 Non-stepnose Project. Ford F100 1977 Sold.
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post #82 of 106 (permalink) Old 02-03-2011, 08:58 AM
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tig

i have been weldding for over 30 years and started with arc welding. mig will give you an awfull lot of scope. but as with arc it does not have the finesse of tig. you don't have to spend a fortune today to buy a good home use unit there are plenty of 240v (uk voltage) 110V input units . it is only alluminium that requires the high frequency option and houshold electric is man enough to weld most sheetmetal needs for mild and stainless.

there is far less distortion when doing long continuous welds such as wheel arch replacement. and it depends on what sort of finish you have in mind. it will be probably a while and a lot of practice before you can join 2 pieces of metal with a but and linish to not notice the join. if you are doing a race car or just trying to restore to a good looking driver go for the mig. if you are into perfection there is only one option really.
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post #83 of 106 (permalink) Old 06-04-2011, 05:24 PM
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Finally switched to gas

Last year I bought one of the Harbor Freight Dual Mig wilders - flux core or gas - and have been struggling with the flux core that it's set up with. Even on the lowest settings it was almost impossible for me to weld the thin sheet metal that I wanted to use to repair the floor pans on my Spider. All I'd get were burn through and very ugly welds. I'd about given up trying to do any of the rust repair myself, and my project has been on hold for months.

Well I finally broke down and picked up a bottle of mig welding gas and some .025 wire. After my first practice session, All I can say is WOW, what a difference! No more burn throughs, and I get nice clean, controlled welds. What a confidence builder. Now I know that I'll be able to finish the work myself. I wish I'd listened to everyone who recommended using gas, and made the switch months ago.

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post #84 of 106 (permalink) Old 06-04-2011, 09:04 PM
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Fiddling with my MIG...
Opinions on these beads?



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post #85 of 106 (permalink) Old 06-04-2011, 10:36 PM
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Looks pretty good and neat but perhaps slow feed speed down a little as slightly more weld build up than necessary (in my opinion).

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'65 Giulia Ti, '69 GT Junior, 72 Spider, '74 2000 GTV, ,`00 156
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post #86 of 106 (permalink) Old 06-05-2011, 09:01 PM
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Monsai52
Make another trip to Harbor Freight and pick up one of THESE.
It will allow you to (almost) weld imagination.
Seriously, it's a useful, inexpensive tool that absorbs heat and permits welding thin or perforated panels without excessive blow-out.

Keyspider
The welds look good ... a little impurity in the center of the first pic caused that crater - but it doesn't look seriously flawed.

A good test of weld is to run a single bead on one edge of a butt joint of box-tubing that you've pictured. After cooling, lever the tubing back and forth until you break the weld. If the weld splits - keep practicing !
If the steel box-tubing splits evenly next to the weld and the penetration shows completely on the back side of the tubing - you're all set !

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post #87 of 106 (permalink) Old 06-06-2011, 12:34 PM
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Thank for the input guys...
I kinda felt looking at the weld, that maybe the wire speed was a tad high too...
I only spotted that hole when I looked at the pic, and I think it was where I had tacked the tubes together, and then did a whole pass over it.
I was using 0.025" wire and Argon/Co2 mix on my "New to me" Snap-On MMSL140 Mig.
As I posted elsewhere, I bought it used last year locally...




The frame is 1" x 1" .0120 wall steel tube for an a pair of 8' x 4' overhead garage storage units.
I think the penetration is good, and I was unable to break the weld on my test piece, so I ground them flush..

Here is a pic of what I am doing...
Number 2 is almost done now...

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Last edited by Keyspider; 06-06-2011 at 12:42 PM.
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post #88 of 106 (permalink) Old 06-13-2011, 02:49 PM
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Primer sanding time prior to painting

I believe that someone said you should spray the primer a day or two before painting. I might have gotten that wrong, but do know that most painters (that I know of) like to paint no more than two days after sanding out the primer.

Why is that? I have four loose panels that I want to paint next week, providing they all sand out well from the primering yesterday. I might cover them, but other than that, I don't see any problem in having them painted a week or even more after final sanding.

But would like to know if there really is a valid reason for the quick turnaround of painting shortly after final sanding of the primer.

Biba

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post #89 of 106 (permalink) Old 09-26-2012, 09:01 PM
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DC Tig welding

I love my Snapon Muscle Mig!
The more I use it, the more I am loving it...
Its 110V, but its a big beast..
It came with an Aluminum MIG Spoolgun, which worked great on an aluminum frame I fixed recently... but it also came with a DC Tig gun setup... Called a Flextig 25.
http://www.800abcweld.com/pdf/flexti...ers_manual.pdf

I had never done ANY type of Tig welding, but recently I had to put a new Catalytic Converter on my Mercedes, and I had run out of CO2/Argon mix gas, and the Argon just was not working good with the Mig...
I decided to give the Flextig a try...
Now this is a DC Tig, and will only do TIG welding on Steel, SS Steel, Chrome-Moly and Cast Iron and Copper.

Its a "Scratch start" TIG... in other words, you have to almost touch the electrode on the job to get the arc started...
It took me a bit, but I was pretty pleased with the result!
Remember, this was the first time I had ever done any TIG welding AND also my welder for this..
I used a cobination of just using the arc to join the two pipes together and then filled any mistakes or holes with some filler rod...


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post #90 of 106 (permalink) Old 09-28-2012, 04:09 PM
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i have a hi freq box...think it allows you to fire up a tig without scratch starting a..

you're welcome to give it a try if you want (not sure how it hooks up)...i'm down in long beach (i was going to use it on my ac/dc arc to tig weld, but just got a mig)

look back on post # 71 from this thread

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