Epic journey 1550mile/2500 in a GTV6 "barn find" - Alfa Romeo Bulletin Board & Forums
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post #1 of 58 (permalink) Old 08-05-2017, 06:25 PM Thread Starter
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Epic journey 1550mile/2500 in a GTV6 "barn find"

Hi all,

I recently bought an 84 GTV6. It was very much a "punt". The owners were an elderly couple who owned the car for 8 or so years. They passed it on to their son who, sadly, died. They were making an attempt to "restore" it but couldn't find a mechanic who knew old Alfas. It as occasionally driven around town. It is "original and unrestored" and it shows. While not a car that had been sitting for years, certainly had been sitting for at least 1 if not 2. It had been available for sale for a LONG time. Prices here in Australia for Alfetta Coupes are going nuts and it is the colour combination I like most (Silver over black). It was in Brisbane and I live 2500km (1500? miles) away in Adelaide.

Anyway, I bought it. I had looked at it and driven it around the block but little more. It is VERY loud as it has "headers" and, more or less a straight through exhaust. It drove like a pig and the old man was adamant not to thrash it. It was clear that they loved the car and hated to part with it.

I went to pick it up this weekend and I discovered... it has some problems.

The bad...

The oil pressure gauge was not moving off the peg.
The Tacho is stuck on 2000rpm... there are wires near the coil that have been disconnected. My "spider senses" tell me...
It seemed to be running on 4 cylinders
There is a driveline vibration that is both noisy and can be felt through the gear stick.
It burns oil but not lots.
The brake pedal is spongy and needs pumping
The headlights are so pathetic it is a not funny: it is sad.
If I try to close the fuse panel the car dies (only did that once!)

The Good.

It really is original and unrestored other than the gear stick knob and the exhaust.
It has all the original engine bay stickers
It has very little rust which has not been fixed and by implication: not been bodged (I hope).
The suspension is lowered and, other than some control arm (upper?) bushes, is very tight.
The interior 7/10... some wear and a cigarette burn on the driver's seat, and it has 4 ugly speakers installed in the doors.
Exterior 5/10 It may have had a partial respray...

On with the story...

My brother lived nearby (100km away) and went down and collected it.

I flew up last Thursday evening and the car started up first time. We took it for a drive in the dark. It was awful. Huge vibration. No power. It seemed to be misfiring. Tires near flat.

Next morning I put it up on some ramps to see if a guibo was cracked. No. All good. I discovered the original plug spanner ! BIG WIN!

I drove it to the parts shop and bought a wire brush and cleaned the plugs. One wet and one sooty. Bought injector cleaner. Now a 6 cylinder, not a 4. Better but not good. Began my 2500km drive home via a friends house 900km (550miles) away. Noise suppressing ear plug headphones needed and used!

Car ran ok in 5th only. Added injector cleaner. Filled with super premium fuel In all other gears it vibrates like a demon. It seems to do so at engine speed. Queensland is warm and dry. Heater stuck on. Windows down. Fumes in through windows thanks to poorly designed exhaust exiting straight out the back and too close to the rear...

Drove all day. 900km. Puffs of smoke from exhaust after lifting off down hill and then accelerating. LOUD. Seems to be 3 noises: exhaust, engine and driveline.

The oil pressure gauge lifted off the peg after 3 or 4 hours.

The car sounds like an aeroplane. It now has that noise that you can hear when a single engine propellor plane is working hard... I'm thinking this is not quite right but LOUD exhaust masks the noise and all 3 noises change with engine speed.

Arrived at my friends house after 11 hours. Handbrake is tight and utterly useless. Gear shift is VERY long, vague and heavy compared to my 79 GTV. It pops out of gear if not fully pushed in to 2nd and 4th. It baulks on first gear if cold. Engine temp sits at about 70c. Very stable. Oil consumption: low

Visited overnight. Beer and Snitzel and TV. Perfect after 9-10 hours in the quite comfy seat. Sore right leg. Fuel economy of about 11litres per 100km. (26mpg)

Took off next morning. 7:30 am. Google maps takes me less desirable route.

Still LOUD. Still vibrating, though now, in 5th it seems to be coming and going a bit. 3 hours in after refuelling I picked up a Canadian Hitchhiker. She added 150kg to the load in the car. Maybe that's unfair but her bag was HEAVY !

This is where it gets weird... no not the hitchhiker. She was your usual 20yo off to the see the world and get a bit of perspective. The weird is that on bends, at speed 110km/hr (70 mph?), the car would vibrate loudly and stutter. On one of these bends it REALLY did so, then suddenly I had oil pressure and the car seemed a bit smoother. It was a serious "***?!"moment. More power too. Oh well... we're still having a lovely chat, we're still travelling forwards...

Dropped off hitchhiker as I turned West for Wagga Wagga (yes it is a place... google it. Wagga Wagga means "many crows" as the Australian Aborigines counted: 1, 2, 3 and then... many. This was quite common). I've driven from Brisbane via Sydney and am now turning West for Adelaide. Nearly ran out of fuel. Well I did... but I was travelling at 80km/h and I ran out 200m from the petrol station. I literally rolled to the pump. Put 66.5l into a 65 l tank.

Continued on. Hour upon hour across the bottom right hand corner of Australia. Epic stuff. Over time it became clear that I now have 2 noises: one is coming directly from under the middle of the car, the other is a lifter tick. The engine knocking/vibration is gone. The exhaust is still painfully, don't worry about the stereo because you can't here is LOUD. About 12 hours in, and for those of you who have never driven on "outback" Australia it is possible to drive 1,000 miles and only slow for towns that have no traffic lights and in many cases no petrol station but they all have a hotel...... These roads are like those in rural Montana. Just you, a white line and huge trucks. After 10 hours in it is now clear that whatever was causing the engine vibration is fixed. In my head it is either a blocked injector, blocked oil filter or partially blocked oil pump because now the engine is running fine BUT still I have a very noisy bearing style growl and as I drive it becomes clear that their drive line has a major problem Houston. The "***" moment was the engine problem "fixing" itself. Over 115km/h/ 70+mph this thing vibrates so bad that acceleration is not possible. If I lift off it disappears and the car runs smooth... until the next time. It happens more on right hand bends.

Now it's getting dark. I've been driving for 10 hours. And am now relying on the head lights... oh dear...

Over the next 4 and half hours I cover the remaining 600km, no that can't be right... may be it was 5 and half... peering into the blackness. Finally I arrive in near home and once again manage to get 66.5 litres into the tank. That light really means: SOON! as against...soon...

As I drive through the traffic, in a major storm (Adelaide is in the "roaring 40's" google that too) and the car is a monster to drive. But when that vibration isn't there (it comes and goes - the ultimate drive train lash?) it is just frightening. Brutal, fast, loud and requires a very manly attitude to manage...

My "punt" paid off. The car runs. It is unmolested though I suspect is has some serious cams (or something) and it took me 2500km in about 40 hours...

Over the next few weeks I will replace all the fluids and get a good look underneath. I suspect the vibration comes from the drive shaft. This page (Alfa GTV6 Driveshaft (propshaft) faq.) lists the possible problems. I suspect that other than the guibos, all the other problems are in play.

I'd be interested to hear any of your experiences regarding any of this but particularly:
...the engine vibration that went away and is somehow clearly associated with the oil pressure. You can see that in the pic the oil pressure gauge is not on the peg even... over time it came up between the first mark and the 4.
... the drive shaft issue...
... head light solutions. Desperately needed...
... the mystery engine killer in the fuse box which is currently hanging down... I'm afraid to try to push it back up...
... fuel economy at 110km/h - 70mph
... heater stuck on...
... do I repaint it or leave it with the blisters, scrapes and cracked air dam?...
...handbrake...?

Cheers


Millsy...
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post #2 of 58 (permalink) Old 08-05-2017, 06:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Millsy View Post
I recently bought an 84 GTV6.
I love an adventure! I bought our GTV6 in Houston, Texas and my wife & I flew down then drove it home to North Carolina (two days drive).

Quote:
...the engine vibration that went away and is somehow clearly associated with the oil pressure.
Not sure how they are related. As far as oil pressure I'd suggest getting it checked with a good oil pressure gauge. The sender for the dash gauge is located in the vee at the back of the engine. The senders are known to be unreliable...

Quote:
... head light solutions.
Easy & cheap - might not be the solution but still worth doing - is to change all the fuses & clean the fuse contacts (a small toothbrush size wire bristle brush works well). The bullet fuses in our cars are known to somehow look OK but fail to allow electrons to flow. If possible, replace with the fuses that have a brass strip instead of an aluminum strip. A more likely solution is to wire in some relays to provide full system voltage to the headlights. The relay system uses the headlight switch to trigger the relays. This way the headlight switch no longer has to (try to) supply enough electrons to power up the headlights.

Quote:
... the mystery engine killer in the fuse box which is currently hanging down...
My guess is a loose connector block in the back of the fuse box. The connector blocks are color coded - make note of or take photos (or both) and make sure all the connectors are snug.

Quote:
... fuel economy at 110km/h - 70mph
Who cares? Well, when I check it I get about 25 MPG (USA miles & gallons).

Quote:
... heater stuck on...
Cable disconnected? The valve is to the right of the console - not sure about access on a RHD car...

Quote:
...handbrake...?
The rear calipers have a specific procedure to adjust the pad clearance (which also affects handbrake efficiency). In fact, I don't think the rear calipers are self-adjusting the way 'normal' calipers are (like the fronts). When I notice the handbrake needs extra travel to hold the car I know it's time to adjust the rear pads.

- - Eric
don't read this
~ 1984 Spider Veloce ~
- -~ 1981 GTV-6 ~
Mebane, North Carolina


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post #3 of 58 (permalink) Old 08-05-2017, 07:19 PM
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Millsy, that's a great account of an epic journey, made clearly by a manly man! I enjoyed every line of it!

Eric's right on target with the headlight relays. If you do a google search on gtv 6 headlight relays, then pick the Alfa BB threads, you'll find the good info faster. Lots of good advice and specific instructions on how to fit them. And don't forget to clean up the lamp plugs themselves, and the nearby grounds. Top it off with modern H1/H4 lamps, and you'll be amazed.

On the electrical issues, I'll get you a link to my electrical PM procedure that worked well on our son's GTV 6. It transformed the car, frankly. But you'll spend most of the day on it, if done well.

Don't forget your filters, fuel conditioner/injector cleaner, and the proven Italian tuneup... AFTER you verify the condition of the timing belt, change the coolant out and change over to a good quality 10w-50 or 15w-50 oil. In fact it may be best to get a new belt on it now, unless it was replaced recently by the PO.

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post #4 of 58 (permalink) Old 08-05-2017, 07:42 PM
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Here's the electrical PM, as I updated/revised it recently compared to my original post back in 2015. Also, there's an oldie but goldie site AlfaGTV6.com ~ Home of the Alfa Romeo Transaxle with tons of good technical info and FAQ's. I used this extensively when we rebuilt the driveshaft last year in Mike's '86.



GTV 6 electrical PM


Have battery tested to ensure it can accept and hold a charge (minimum 12.5 – 12.8 volts).

Clean all grounds (electrical spray cleaner, wire brush, spray clean again) & grounding bolts & ring connectors.

Clean battery ground strap bolt & lug at chassis, use a toothed lockwasher and apply dielectric grease and tighten.

Clean engine to chassis ground strap lugs and bolts. Use a toothed lockwasher at both ends.

Clean intake plenum to cam cover ground strap (on driver side at front).

Verify alternator output under load conditions, clean wire terminals, check security of mount bolts.

Clean wire lugs, spade connectors and nuts at starter cable junction block on firewall.

Clean wire lugs, spade connectors and nuts at alternator cable junction block on left side fender.

Remove all connectors from rear of fuse block (one at a time), spray with electrical contact cleaner, reattach.

Inspect connectors at rear of fuse block for evidence of overheating or burned insulation

Remove all relays at fuse block, spray sockets and relay spade terminals with electrical contact cleaner

Inspect relay sockets for security of female ends of terminals (none loose or pushed back into connector).

Replace any suspect relays that show evidence of overheating or burnt/loose terminals.

Disconnect battery, remove all fuses, clean fuse tabs carefully using fine scotchbrite pad. Spray with contact cleaner.

Check tension on fuse tabs at fuse block, carefully bend as needed to set all tabs to maintain adequate tension on fuses. Fuses should not be loose when proper tension is set.

Install new copper or brass link fuses (NOT aluminum) into fuse block. Ensure that they seat into indentations in tabs.


Disconnect all connectors under hood, spray both ends with electrical contact cleaner, reconnect.

Spray starter cable connections with electrical contact cleaner, clean and check security of connections.

Disconnect all connectors under/behind dash, spray both ends with electrical contact cleaner, reconnect.

Disconnect all lighting connectors, spray both ends with electrical contact cleaner, reconnect.

(make certain battery is disconnected) Remove cover over ECU, loosen retainer clip on wire harness plug, disconnect plug. Spray plug and ECU contacts lightly with electronics cleaner, allow to flash dry. Carefully reconnect harness and resecure retainer.

Remove steering wheel shroud, spray inside of combination headlight switch/turn signals with electric contact cleaner. Actuate switch slowly during spraying to clean off contacts. Using a small thin plastic applicator, lightly apply dielectric grease to contacts.

Remove steering wheel shroud, spray inside of wiper/washer switch with electric contact cleaner. Actuate switch slowly during spraying to clean off contacts. Using a small thin plastic applicator, lightly apply dielectric grease to contacts.

Disconnect electric window and mirror connectors behind door upholstery panels, spray with electrical contact cleaner, reconnect.

Remove all tail light, stop light, and backup light bulbs, spray sockets with electrical cleaner (use safety glasses!), allow to dry. Clean corrosion from inside of sockets and contact fingers. Spray again with contact cleaner, allow to dry. Reinstall new bulbs, applying a light coating of conductive bulb grease onto base. Adjust spring pressure of contact fingers as needed to ensure they make good contact with the bottom of the bulbs.

Carefully unplug the three connectors from the tail light circuit boards. Spray the copper contact tabs on the boards and the inside of the connectors (the contact fingers) with contact cleaner. Lightly clean the copper tabs on the board with a toothbrush. Inspect the contact fingers for looseness or wide gaps between them (not gripping the board tightly), and bend/adjust as needed with a small screwdriver or pick. Reinstall the connectors, and verify conductivity of each wire lead to the board with a VOM.

Unplug headlights, spray connectors with electrical cleaner, allow to dry. Apply thin coat of dielectric grease to lamp terminals and reconnect securely. Clean headlight and parking light ground connections also at this time.
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post #5 of 58 (permalink) Old 08-05-2017, 09:17 PM
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So down the Newell and then the Sturt to Adelaide? Good trip. Have driven the Newell and New England several times in various Alfas and more than one trip well into country NSW in my old GTV6. Great memories.

One time did a trip in my 105 GTV from Melbourne, up to Canberra, across to Temora, and then across to Adelaide before heading back to Melbourne via the Great Ocean Road. Two up to Canberra then the rest of the trip three up.

But to your questions, if the oil pressure was that bad you'd know by now. It does sound like a dodgy sender, very common. Re. the vibrations, are all the transaxle and engine mounts ok? The clutch mount rubbers are particularly prone to break and if you've got custom made exhaust does it rub / hit anywhere? That could explain the variation in corners.

The rear brakes do have a self adjustment mechanism. There is a small device inside the rear caliper pistons which relies on pressure being applied to "wind out" the piston as the pads wear. To adjust put foot firmly on the brake pedal and vigorously work the handbrake lever. Takes a little while but it works. That's how I used to adjust the rear brakes between runs when sprinting Alfetta's. Always worked.

Nice car by the way, you're right values are quickly heading north. Justifiably so if you compare them to some of the over priced British 'sports' cars.

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post #6 of 58 (permalink) Old 08-05-2017, 09:20 PM
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Oh, at a steady 110km/h on those roads you should easily get better than 10 litres / 100k. In the old money I'd often get 35mpg out of mine.

Alister
1973 105 GTV (Alfa #6 of 19 owned)
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post #7 of 58 (permalink) Old 08-05-2017, 11:28 PM Thread Starter
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Awesome stuff! I will try to keep you all up to date.
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post #8 of 58 (permalink) Old 08-05-2017, 11:45 PM Thread Starter
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Aggie,

No, As noted I visited a friend who was ill in Newcastle. So it was the Pacific Highway, then down the Hume to Wagga then across the Sturt to Balranald, turn left for Toolebuc through to Murrayville, Ouyen, Pinnarro and one of my favourite bit of road ever onto Taliem Bend. When I said Google maps took me the wrong way it was the Newell that I wanted but I got the Pacific. Oh well, then I wouldn't have had the company of Miss Canada for a couple of hours.
The hand brake I think is NFG. The lever is stiff and moves but it has no purchase. Possibly the rear pads are oily, cable itself is "dry" or pistons seized. The brakes need a complete and careful "long hard look".
Yeah I thought I should be doing better than 26mpg. My 2litre 40mm Dellorto does better than that. The car was parked in a closed in underground car park will walls less than a metre on all sides. When the oldies started it up the car was sucking in it's own black oily fumes. The air filter shows this to be so. No doubt the MAF is filthy too, so most likely it was running rich and quite possibly the engine vibration that disappeared was a dirty injector or two meaning it was running on 4 or 5 cylinders. Better to rich than too lean so I left the really clogged air filter in place.

I also think the vibration and drag is most likely the centre carrier bearing and even when it wasn't vibrating like an aircraft engine it was still really sucking up the power. On the few occasions the drive shaft settled down it was just amazingly smooth and powerful. It's hard to believe but when it really vibrated the car would simply not accelerate.

Thanks for your advice too. I got a PM from an Alfisti here in Adelaide who sounds like a nice bloke. Will be joining the local Alfa Club again after a 20 year absence...
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post #9 of 58 (permalink) Old 08-06-2017, 11:48 AM
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"I also think the vibration and drag is most likely the centre carrier bearing and even when it wasn't vibrating like an aircraft engine it was still really sucking up the power. On the few occasions the drive shaft settled down it was just amazingly smooth and powerful. It's to believe but when it really vibrated the car would simply not accelerate"

Based on my own experience with the V6 (in this case my 94LS), the situation was more likely either injector problems or sparkplug mis/not firing. My LS ran just like that when it had one of the ignition modules give up the ghost on at least one cylinder, resulting a drive home with a very rough running engine with considerably less power, almost unable to accelerate. Was shocked just how anemic the engine was with one cylinder out. And of course, the fuel mileage would go to pot in a hurry under these circumstances. Once the guilty module was changed, the engine purred as it should, with vigor.

So, I recommend changing the plugs (many use NGK), checking/cleaning the rotor and cap, and using an injector cleaner in the fuel (might I recommend something like Techron (don't know that much about Seafoam), which I've used for years with no injector problems ever in an Alfa). Clean all of the electrical connections in the engine bay, esp the multiwire connector going to the air flow meter attached to the air filter box.

If doing those chores doesn't make things much better, then yes, you might have additional problems.

I suspect the air filter in or out doesn't affect the mixture, that being handled downstream.

Have fun, looks like my first GTV6, having leather seats instead of what you have. Your drive with the car, while frustrating I'm sure, sounded like great fun otherwise.

Del

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1989 Milano, Shankle Sport
1991 164S, stock
1994 164LS (~Q)
1972 Morgan 27

previously owned since 1964:

62 Morris MiniMinor 850, 67 Austin 1275 Cooper S (Downton 3/4 race), 64 Giulia Sprint GT (1st red one made), 72 Fiat 128 Sedan, 75 Alfetta Sedan, 78 Alfetta Sedan, 78 GTV, 81 GTV6, 86 GTV6

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post #10 of 58 (permalink) Old 08-06-2017, 03:55 PM Thread Starter
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Del, I think you are/were right but I suspect BOTH the injector issue and the driveshaft issue is/was in play so either way I have to address both issues. There is an audible noise coming from the centre bearing area under the car, the engine has a "tappet tick" and as I wrote above there seemed to be some association between the oil pressure gauge and the improvement of the running of the car. But there was the episode where the car stuttered badly and then suddenly improved to a state better than when I first drove it. It idles nicely, though a bit low, and it pulls really well until the vibration kicks in.
Regardless I will go through the same process I did with my mum's car already this year. Like lots of little old ladies she let the car's maintenance fall behind and when she could no longer drive it sat and sat and sat. I changed every fluid including the diff (Honda CRV have clutch packs in the diffs and get really noisy when the fluid gets old), removed wheels to inspect brakes and brake drums and cleaned them, fixed some suspension bushes, replaced all the filters, engine and transmission oils etc. Cleaned it no less than 7 times as she lived on a dirt country road. Lubricated all the door hinges, sunroof slides etc, etc,

Basically I did all the back maintenance and fixed what ever was left over. I then sold it at the top of it's price range to the first person who came to see it.

I see you had a Mini Cooper S. I had a very tired one in the early '80s when I was 18. It was the only car I ever truly cried about when I sold it. I was too poor to keep it as I was going to Uni and didn't have the money to fix it and nowhere to store it and couldn't leave it outside as we live by the sea. What a wonderful thing it was. It was almost a alive. Rough, Raucous and a giant killer in races with V8 "A" bodies.

Will print off all the advice given here. The common theme is electrical connections and the car has had some electrical work done as it has a new set of man in cables from battery to engine. The later Alfettas have a reputation for these issues and indeed when I retrieved my 79 Alfetta from it's 10 year rest from a dry shed this was an issue too with lights especially.

Cheers and thanks.
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post #11 of 58 (permalink) Old 08-06-2017, 04:07 PM Thread Starter
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Aggie...

One time did a trip in my 105 GTV from Melbourne, up to Canberra, across to Temora, and then across to Adelaide before heading back to Melbourne via the Great Ocean Road. Two up to Canberra then the rest of the trip three up.

I lived in Cooma for a while. The road between Cooma and Wagga is one of the most "entertaining" roads in all of Australia. The roads out West of Cooma were like wise. One Tuesday night I went for a "drive" in my '79 GTV 2 litre. High Beams with 100w globes and speeds between 120 and 170km/h. Just awesome. No one around, open roads fabulous. Alfa motor singing like Pavaroti on a promise. I did it regularly until... I drove past a 6 foot Red Buck 'Roo who was standing right on the edge of the road just around a bend at near 150m/h. That was it. Never did it again.

Still 25 years later... when no one's looking and I'm alone in the car... the window goes down and the tires get a workout. Very, very occasional now though.
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post #12 of 58 (permalink) Old 08-06-2017, 04:29 PM
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" I see you had a Mini Cooper S.... I ever truly cried about when I sold it"

I bought the 67 Cooper S new in London, drove it around Europe for a month, and then left it off at Downton Engr Wks in Salisbury to be modified to one of their advertised competition packages before having it shipped to the dealer in Seattle (ended up being one of the last legal ones into the States). Was an absolute ball to drive, had 125 hp, 0-60 mph time of 5.9 sec. A real hotrod, surprising many drivers of sports cars, lol.

I still regret selling it, but at the time, autocrossing it with success and also using it as a dd, I had to completely rebuild the engine and diff every 5000 miles. Too much power for the A series engine, wore the rod bearings right to the copper packing, and wore out the diff spiders and shaft terribly. Luckily, the crank was nitrided so no damage there, could just use standard size bearings.

Kinda got tired of that removal (unbolt the subframe and lift/roll the body back from the engine assy) and rebuild process.

Sold it to a guy in 1971 who raced it, overrevved it, and broke the crank. I think he still has it but never fixed. Wish I had it back, worth a lot of money now, even as is.

Yeah, I know it's not an Alfa. It had been replaced previously by the 64 Giulia Sprint GT which I had bought in 66 as the daily driver. Nuff said, I think, well, for the most part anyway. That Mini WAS a blast to drive, faster around the track than the Alfa. The Sprint GT, however, is still the prettiest Alfa I've ever owned and driven. It was the reason I fell in love with Alfas, and have had them ever since. Put 260k miles on it, let it go cosmetically which I have always regretted (it was so beautiful when I first bought it), and of course regret I sold it. Should have kept it and restored it.
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Del

Seattle

1989 Milano, Shankle Sport
1991 164S, stock
1994 164LS (~Q)
1972 Morgan 27

previously owned since 1964:

62 Morris MiniMinor 850, 67 Austin 1275 Cooper S (Downton 3/4 race), 64 Giulia Sprint GT (1st red one made), 72 Fiat 128 Sedan, 75 Alfetta Sedan, 78 Alfetta Sedan, 78 GTV, 81 GTV6, 86 GTV6

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post #13 of 58 (permalink) Old 08-06-2017, 09:30 PM
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Aggie...

One time did a trip in my 105 GTV from Melbourne, up to Canberra, across to Temora, and then across to Adelaide before heading back to Melbourne via the Great Ocean Road. Two up to Canberra then the rest of the trip three up.

I lived in Cooma for a while. The road between Cooma and Wagga is one of the most "entertaining" roads in all of Australia. The roads out West of Cooma were like wise. One Tuesday night I went for a "drive" in my '79 GTV 2 litre. High Beams with 100w globes and speeds between 120 and 170km/h. Just awesome. No one around, open roads fabulous. Alfa motor singing like Pavaroti on a promise. I did it regularly until... I drove past a 6 foot Red Buck 'Roo who was standing right on the edge of the road just around a bend at near 150m/h. That was it. Never did it again.

Still 25 years later... when no one's looking and I'm alone in the car... the window goes down and the tires get a workout. Very, very occasional now though.
Great roads! Or head west from Grafton over to Glen Innes, we could go on 😊. Funny about the 'Roo - living here in the US I get told quite regularly that Australia has all these dangerous animals. Which first of all is weird in place covered in coyotes, rattle snakes, bears, and the odd mountain lion. But tell folks about the very real dangers of 'Roo's at dusk and you get quizzical looks.

I got hit in my GTV6 once just outside Kinglake in Victoria, thankfully lightly on the left side behind the door and very little damage. But a hell of a wake up call, didn't see him until he came out of the bushes and only then out of the corner of my eye.

Alister
1973 105 GTV (Alfa #6 of 19 owned)
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post #14 of 58 (permalink) Old 08-06-2017, 09:47 PM
Del
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When we drove in OZ, we were warned about that danger. Have the same problem in the US with deer jumping out in front of a car, esp in the eastern half of the country. When we drove around in Wisconsin, just couldn't believe all the deer everywhere by the sides of the road.

Would love to do more driving/traveling in OZ some day. Watching the Doctor Blake Mysteries shows (love his quaint car, a Standard?) which supposedly take place in Ballarat always remind me of when we stayed there.

Hopefully, Millsy will get his GTV6 running as smoothly as it should be. Our 86 GTV6 was really one of the better Alfas we owned. It drove and ran very strongly. Our only trouble with it was that neither of us really appreciated the body style, but that's just us, lol. Drove the 91 164S for the first time at the dealer, and that took care of that.

Del

Seattle

1989 Milano, Shankle Sport
1991 164S, stock
1994 164LS (~Q)
1972 Morgan 27

previously owned since 1964:

62 Morris MiniMinor 850, 67 Austin 1275 Cooper S (Downton 3/4 race), 64 Giulia Sprint GT (1st red one made), 72 Fiat 128 Sedan, 75 Alfetta Sedan, 78 Alfetta Sedan, 78 GTV, 81 GTV6, 86 GTV6

Last edited by Del; 08-06-2017 at 10:53 PM.
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post #15 of 58 (permalink) Old 08-07-2017, 03:02 AM Thread Starter
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Del, my Cooper S was also a 67 with a "race" cam and looking back I'm glad I was 18 because that's the age to own such a wasp of a car BUT like you, the 105 Guilia Coupe caught my eye and remains one of the most beautiful cars I have ever seen. It;s the "whole package" which for me includes accessible as well as pretty etc. However, for me the Alfetta is a more significant car on all levels except looks. I do think, though, that the steel bumper models have aged very well, while the GTV6 remains "compromised".
The Alfetta is "significant" IMHO because it is the last car that was engineered to be good rather than engineered to be OK and then applying electrickery to compensate for the shortcomings of the design. Other than the gear change flaw what other car provides the handling balance, the sound of 4 carby throats, 100mph+ speed, the insane cornering grip, comfortable ride and the social position of the Alfetta? It attracts admiration without the jealousy of a Ferrari; it marks the end of the "mechanical" era; it has a boot, can go over a speed hump and the harder and better you drive it the harder and better it goes. Oh and you can fix it yourself. Try that with a R32 GTR... The 911 only became good after 25 years and even then they still bite. British? TR6? You need to tune the suspension, engine and chassis. Lotus? No boot, no heater, no radio...

The best bit though is that with these cars (like an MX5) you can really drive them and still be within cooee of the law. Not so now with an M3 or 911.
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