Problem With Mold - Alfa Romeo Bulletin Board & Forums
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-09-2010, 05:01 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Dale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Summerville, South Carolina
Posts: 458
Problem With Mold

I live in the very humid south - South Carolina ... and I'm having trouble with mold forming in the car. My GTV is currently up on blocks/jack stands in the garage while I'm doing some work. Windows open or windows shut doesn't matter...mold still forms in it. I'm going to try and get her on the road again very soon, but it'll be at least another 2-3 months at a minimum. Any thoughts? In the distant future, I'll run some AC out there, but that's way off. Any help much appreciated.

Dale

Dale Thomas - 1969 1750 GTV
Summerville, South Carolina

Last edited by Dale; 08-09-2010 at 05:18 PM.
Dale is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-09-2010, 05:42 PM
Registered User
 
andy303's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 954
Dehumidifying is the key. Is it possible to keep it in an enclosed space with a dehumidifier? Not cheap perhaps, but one solution. I would first try to clean the mold out as best as you can. Leaving the car out in the sun for a while would help.

Another idea would be to keep it in something like this: Classic Car Cocoon, classic car cover for corrosion prevention

I have one of these for winter storage and it works pretty well. I live on the south shores of beautiful Lake Erie and my car goes into hibernation for four months or so every winter. When my car comes out in the spring there is no rust on the brake rotors, so I figure the cocoon is doing what is claimed. The only downside is that on cars without a working evap cannister the gas tank will vent into the cocoon as well. I used it with a TR250 and it was kinda stinky for a day, but not so with a Miata and a Series 3 Spider.

Andy
81 Spider - 1980 VIN
andy303 is offline  
post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-09-2010, 09:09 PM
Registered User
 
fangio8c's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 2,449
An ozone generator ($200 or so) could help and would be much cheaper than an a/c unit in upfront and running costs. First you will need to knock it back with a rag and some lysol (or similar... carefully testing on materials that might fade).

We used to run an ozone generator in the barrel cellars of a winery where I used to work to combat mold. The difference was night and day when we ran it vs. when we didn't. Just remember that ozone gas (03) is NOT safe for humans or pets to breathe. So you'll have to air out the area (garage, interior or car) before entering.

Regardless, I agree with the previous post that dehumidifying (air conditioning) the cars environment would be the most ideal way to deal with the problem.

Gone but not forgotten:
1970 GTV 1750 S2
1967 Giulia Super

Last edited by fangio8c; 08-09-2010 at 09:12 PM.
fangio8c is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-10-2010, 04:08 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Dale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Summerville, South Carolina
Posts: 458
Thanks. I've started researching dehumidifiers.

Dale Thomas - 1969 1750 GTV
Summerville, South Carolina
Dale is offline  
post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-10-2010, 07:15 AM
Registered User
 
AlfaRomeo1750's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Eastern TN
Posts: 1,181
Garage
Put a desiccant in there... something like diatomaceous earth... preferably in a cloth sac... that will draw moisture out of the air and help with the mold.

Something else you may want to try... wipe the non-bleachable surfaces down with Chlorox to kill off the mold spores that may be lingering in there.
AlfaRomeo1750 is offline  
post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-10-2010, 07:57 AM
Registered User
 
divotandtralee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Cape Cod, MAssachusetts
Posts: 7,235
First thing I would do is strip the interior until you want to get it back on the road--Remove seats, door panels, and any floor treatment even in the trunk. That should take all of an hour and a half. Store them in a conditioned space like a spare bedroom.

I have a sneaking suspicion you have water under the floor covering anyway so this is a good exercise. That leaves only the headliner and leave it alone. If you see any signs of mold on it (black), spritz it with a squirt bottle of 50% water and 50% bleach. Let it sit about 3-5 minute and rinse with clear water and wipe it dry. While you have this bottle spray the underside of the seats and floor covering. Don't drench them! Just about the amount you cover a window or mirror when you wash them. It shouldn't bleed through even on black carpet if after you spray it you flip it back up and spread them on a hot drive way. Jute backing is a favorite harbor for those mold spores. Ever notice that punget odor in VW's, Porsche's and Giuliettas? It's a small amout of mold growing in the old jute backings. That smell is called patina unless it has taken over.

Mold will appear sooty or powdery and isn't green like fruit or bread mold. It will disappear once sprayed. Let the backing of the carpets and seats dry on their own.

Mold will not grow on metal. period. Next open all the windows and let that hot humid air in and crack the garage overhead door to get some ventilation across the floor where moisture can form on the surfacewhen it reaches the dew point usually in the morning. Open the windows and doors in the car. Mold will have a very hard time growing where there is moving air.

Go down to Wally World and buy two occillating fans made in China for $35 TOTAL. Plug em' in and let them rip 24/7 leaving your windows and doors cracked in the garage and the car.

If it rains, button up the place to keep the gross moisture out, then reopen it after the steam bath has subsided.

Good luck.

PS BEST SOLUTION: MOVE

Last edited by divotandtralee; 08-10-2010 at 08:15 AM.
divotandtralee is online now  
post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-10-2010, 08:49 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Dale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Summerville, South Carolina
Posts: 458
Very good advice. Most of it, I had all ready done. The door panels and seats are in my house. I also have the windows open with a fan blowing through it. I'll remove the rest of the interior, keep the fan blowing and invest in a dehumidifier. Thanks for taking the time.

Dale Thomas - 1969 1750 GTV
Summerville, South Carolina
Dale is offline  
post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-10-2010, 08:52 AM
1966-2013
Platinum Subscriber
 
Tifosi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Northern NY, USA
Posts: 13,741
Random tidbit regarding dessicant:

Baby diapers labelled as 'super absorbant' have the same stuff in them as those dessicant bags you can buy that are filled with what looks like little translucent crystals.

If you've got kids, grandkids, freinds with kids who are still in diapers, nab a few and lay them out as flat as you can.

Or tear into them and get the stuff out of them and put it in little cotton packets/pillows. (old T-shirts work well and provide enough material for several packs if you've got access to a sewing machine)
That way when they 'fill up' you can put them in the oven at low heat and dry them out for re-use many times over.




Darren
'84 manufacture ~ '85 MY Spider Graduate

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

as hosted by

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
&
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Tifosi is offline  
post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-10-2010, 09:36 AM
Registered User
 
fangio8c's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 2,449
HUGE (relatively affordable) bags of desiccant are available from U-Line. However, I don't think even a 50lb bag full of desiccant could 100% defeat South Carolina summer humidity.

Gone but not forgotten:
1970 GTV 1750 S2
1967 Giulia Super
fangio8c is offline  
post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-11-2010, 02:55 PM
Del
Senior Member
Gold Subscriber
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: seattle
Posts: 15,288
We can have the same sort of problem with boats moored here in Puget Sound all year around (and think months of steady rain, lol).

To reduce/eliminate the mold problem, we use a plug in (110v) air warmer (mild heat, safe) sold for boats, and also use the boating desiccant sold in marine stores. Works pretty well. Make sure the car is closed up so that you are not trying to dry the world's atmosphere. Taking out the interior panels and seats is a good idea as well. And finally, I would use Armorall and leather treatment on what is left to have a coating on that material for the duration.

Del

Seattle

1989 Milano, Shankle Sport
1991 164S, stock
1994 164LS (~Q)
1972 Morgan 27

previously owned since 1964:

62 Morris MiniMinor 850, 67 Austin 1275 Cooper S (Downton 3/4 race), 64 Giulia Sprint GT (1st red one made), 72 Fiat 128 Sedan, 75 Alfetta Sedan, 78 Alfetta Sedan, 78 GTV, 81 GTV6, 86 GTV6

Last edited by Del; 08-11-2010 at 02:59 PM.
Del is offline  
post #11 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-11-2010, 05:29 PM
Registered User
 
Lokki's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Dallas Texas
Posts: 1,703
Garage
The air warmer is a good idea. When I lived in Panama, all the closets in my house had venetian blind style doors and had several 60 watt electric light bulbs up and down the walls of the closet to generate heat and thus low humidity. The advantage of the bulbs is that you can put them throughout the car (in each of the corners and in the trunk) to disperse the heat evenly. Of course, your car will glow like a spaceship at night.

We also had electric dehumidifiers which could be hooked up with a tube drain - these worked very well, even in the tropics. They've a better answer than the dessicants since - if hooked up with a drain tube (instead of a catch tank) they can pretty much be ignored. No-action protection is better than having to remember to periodically change out the dessicants.

71 Spider

Last edited by Lokki; 08-11-2010 at 05:31 PM.
Lokki is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Alfa Romeo Bulletin Board & Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome