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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-08-2006, 01:42 PM Thread Starter
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Freccia d'Oro

A simple question: why is Alfa Romeo's first post-war production car called the Freccia d'Oro?

I'm writing a quick article and could benefit from some help (also the name has always interested me). I've noticed arrows in period Alfa adverts too.

EDIT: Also how many were built - 680?

[SIZE="1"][I]"Ho ancora per la nostra Alfa, siatene certi, l’adolescente tenerezza del primo amore, l’affetto immacolato per la mamma!"[/I]
[COLOR="Red"][B]Enzo Ferrari[/B][/COLOR][/SIZE]

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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-11-2006, 08:33 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Il Serpente
A simple question: why is Alfa Romeo's first post-war production car called the Freccia d'Oro?

I'm writing a quick article and could benefit from some help (also the name has always interested me). I've noticed arrows in period Alfa adverts too.

EDIT: Also how many were built - 680?

Freccia d'Oro means Golden Arrow in English. Something like 1600 6c2550s of ALL types were all that were built; I'll check on exact numbers later todat, as I have to look at my Fusi, and I'm on my way out the door...
Stu
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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-12-2006, 10:26 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks Stu - I knew the translation (of course ), but was just wondering why? Was there a golden show car or something?

[SIZE="1"][I]"Ho ancora per la nostra Alfa, siatene certi, l’adolescente tenerezza del primo amore, l’affetto immacolato per la mamma!"[/I]
[COLOR="Red"][B]Enzo Ferrari[/B][/COLOR][/SIZE]
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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-12-2006, 07:44 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Il Serpente
Thanks Stu - I knew the translation (of course ), but was just wondering why? Was there a golden show car or something?
No, it has more to do with the fact that in the first Carrera Panamericana in Mexico, a single carb Freccia d'Oro did extremely well, winning it's class and finishing very high overall.

The 6c2300B MM was called "La Freccia della Mille Miglia" in the factory 1937 poster (Of which I have a REAL one)!
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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-12-2006, 09:50 PM
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Originally Posted by dretceterini
No, it has more to do with the fact that in the first Carrera Panamericana in Mexico, a single carb Freccia d'Oro did extremely well, winning it's class and finishing very high overall.
No.

The design was from late 45-6, production began in 46-7 and ended in 1950. The first Carrera Panamericana was in 1950, where two 6C2500 Freccia d'Oro cars finished well. But they were, of course, already Golden Arrows.

--Carter

I do wonder if there is a story behind the name. Maybe not. Ben H. [HK 55] simply explained that the 6C2500 Berlinas in 1947 were "now under the name Freccia d'Oro."
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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-13-2006, 03:37 AM Thread Starter
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I think maybe the name Freccia d'Oro comes from the legend of Cupid's arrow, which came in two varieties: the Golden Arrow (which generally signifies true love), and the leaden arrow (which represents wanton and sensual passion). Alfa Romeo could have christened the car Freccia d'Oro as they were so taken by the shape. Needless to say it had also been used by motorcycle manufacturer Bianchi in 1934, and in 1935 was the title of a romantic Italian film.

[SIZE="1"][I]"Ho ancora per la nostra Alfa, siatene certi, l’adolescente tenerezza del primo amore, l’affetto immacolato per la mamma!"[/I]
[COLOR="Red"][B]Enzo Ferrari[/B][/COLOR][/SIZE]
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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-13-2006, 04:21 AM
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I never wondered about the name's origin before this thread raised the question, but the most probable place to find an explanation should be Anselmi's book. I haven't it at hand now, but several other members own a copy. Has anyone checked yet?
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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-13-2006, 06:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Il Serpente
...the name Freccia d'Oro comes from the legend of Cupid's arrow, which came in two varieties: the Golden Arrow (which generally signifies true love), and the leaden arrow (which represents wanton and sensual passion)... it had also been used by motorcycle manufacturer Bianchi in 1934, and in 1935 was the title of a romantic Italian film.
and a Conrad novel... Bianchi had different color arrows [different models], didn't they? I do like the idea of a motorcyle named Lead Arrow.

My Italian is awful but I didn't find any explanation of the name in Tito Anselmi's book. Ben H. said there were 700 6c2500 "916" series cars made after the coloniales, and Anselmi's list has about 70 of these cars sent out for other coachwork.

--Carter
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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-04-2006, 07:54 AM
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I've noticed the word "arrow" used in italian/english narated videos about racing and road cars and also in books. Why? I guess something didn't come over in the translation? For example "The silver arrows" for German cars and "red arrows" for Italian. This is a little off the Freccia d oro subject but might it mean something? I have always wondered why racing cars from the pre-war period and immediate post-war are called "arrows"
Jeff

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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-04-2006, 10:25 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarterHendricks
No.

The design was from late 45-6, production began in 46-7 and ended in 1950. The first Carrera Panamericana was in 1950, where two 6C2500 Freccia d'Oro cars finished well. But they were, of course, already Golden Arrows.

--Carter

I do wonder if there is a story behind the name. Maybe not. Ben H. [HK 55] simply explained that the 6C2500 Berlinas in 1947 were "now under the name Freccia d'Oro."
I thought the cars were just called 6c2500 berlinas before their outstanding results in the 1950 Carrera PA. Was there some earlier race in which their results gained them the name?
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post #11 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-04-2006, 10:46 AM
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Interesting that Bianchi are still using the arrow for their frame names:

http://www.bianchiusa.com/05_fc_hc.html

Note the price

'85 GTV6
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post #12 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-04-2006, 12:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dretceterini
I thought the cars were just called 6c2500 berlinas before their outstanding results in the 1950 Carrera PA. Was there some earlier race in which their results gained them the name?
The cars were only put together for a few more months after the Carrera Panamericana, and Alfa didn't make much of the success in Mexico. They were called Freccia d'Oro from their beginnings.

other question:

I mentioned Bianchi motorcycles. There were different colors, even Frescia Celeste. But these blue arrows from the old motorcycle manufacturer [Nuvolari rode some Bianchi's] were a different color than the Bianchi bicycle frames.

--Carter
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post #13 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-04-2006, 12:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarterHendricks
The cars were only put together for a few more months after the Carrera Panamericana, and Alfa didn't make much of the success in Mexico. They were called Freccia d'Oro from their beginnings.
--Carter
OK, but there has to be some logical reason behind the name.

Do you think it has anything to do with calling the 6c2300B MM "La Freccia della Mille Miglia" on the 1937 advertising posters?
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