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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 11-28-2005, 12:15 PM Thread Starter
 
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Campagnolo...

I was searching for some De Tomaso info when I noticed that one of its models(the Vallelunga) was equipped with Campagnolo brakes... I had the impression that Campagnolo only produced rims... Can anyone clarify this?..
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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 11-28-2005, 01:10 PM
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They Even Produce Entire Bikes !!!
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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 11-29-2005, 12:33 PM
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Tullio Campagnolo was an early bicycle racer who had an epiphany one day while climbing a hill. This resulted in the modern concept of the derailleur, and the rest is history.

On the automotive front, Campy is certainly best known for wheels, but it would not surprise me if they made other components. Afterall, they make allegedly one of the world's best corkscrews (the "Big Lusso").

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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 11-30-2005, 09:49 PM
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Mr. Vercetti:

Campagnolo has made a lot of different things over the years, I worked in bicycle shops in the late 60s/early 70s & we used to have sales reps for Campi distributors show us limited edition softbound glossy company portfolios of lots of the different products Campi made in those days. I remember seeing photos of the auto brake caliper castings, they made simply stunning magnesium motorcycle racing wheels with 4 leading shoe drum brakes(!!), later a few styles of disc brake type motorcycle wheels, never saw any of these in the flesh, and I used to race motorcycles as well as bicycles.

The portfolios showed photos of very high tech, gargantuan forging presses used for all kinds of exotic metal forging, they were industry innovators in pressure die casting of exotic magnesium & aluminum alloys, they made lots of very, very, complicated castings & forgings for use in the aerospace industry. Those Campi portfolios were stunning, wish I could come across some today. Probably all got thrown away.

The November 2005 issue of Classic & Sports Car has an article on the De Tomaso Vallelunga, the article talks about the Campi calipers, I bet Campi cast a lot of the suspension uprights for the rear suspension, etc..

I have Campi aftermarket wheels on the Jr Z & my bike geek buddies can't believe they made auto wheels. I have to show them the Campi logos on the center caps. They are pressure die cast magnesium & only weigh 10.5 lbs each, pick 'em with one finger.

AlfaRonny:

Campi has never made entire bicycles, just individual component parts, but there are so many Campi logos all over the parts it's easy to see how people think they made/make bikes.

Arno:

Actually, the epiphany Tullio had while climbing the hill was the quick release. His back wheel had slipped over & jammed into the chainstay, he had to stop on the uphill & retighten the wing nuts the racers in those days used to loosen wheels for tire changes & chain length changes they had to make to accomodate the different size gears on the cranks & rear wheels. It was hard to tighten the wingnuts tight enough, this led Tullio to think of inventing the cam based quick release wheel retention system we now have on most bicycles.

The French & a few other folks had been messing around with crude derailleurs & spring tensioned chain tightening systems, but they were not that good. Tullio developed and refined the paralellogram based gear shifing system that allowed the chain to closely track the cogs, and he refined the coil spring chain tensioning system. In short, he really improved the shifting systems to the point that we still use the same basic ideas for this as well. He was a brilliant innovator and a good business man as well. His company was very successful & profitable while he was alive & running it, it went downhill in the 80s, I think a big conglomerate bought them out, they are no longer thought of as the undisputed leaders in bike parts, although they are still very good.

And yes they make the world's best corkscrew. I've had one for years, it pulls corks out with the greatest of ease, smooth as silk with never a broken cork. I think you can still get them at good high end bike shops.

Bruce
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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-01-2005, 10:01 AM
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Bruce:

Duh, my mistake on the skewer thing. I think I got a couple of stories twisted about on themselves... Thanks for the correction.

Arno
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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-03-2005, 06:32 AM Thread Starter
 
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Tnx a lot for your replies guys!! . So if Campagnolo was such a successful company why isnt around nowdays?...
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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-03-2005, 08:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.Vercetti
I was searching for some De Tomaso info when I noticed that one of its models(the Vallelunga) was equipped with Campagnolo brakes... I had the impression that Campagnolo only produced rims... Can anyone clarify this?..
A history of Amadori and Campagnolo is sketched out in this interview:

http://www.tawvehicle.com/roberto.htm

and of course Campagnolo is still supreme:

http://www.campagnolo.com/

--Carter
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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-03-2005, 08:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.Vercetti
Tnx a lot for your replies guys!! . So if Campagnolo was such a successful company why isnt around nowdays?...
Campy is still around these days! They still produce the most expensive racing bike parts. Many say Shimano and the smaller independents make better parts, but Campy still has that cachet that Shimano will never have.

Attached is one of the most beautiful bicycle components they ever made:
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'85 GTV6
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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-28-2005, 09:19 PM
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The Campagnolo brakes on the Vallelunga are a major headache for restoreres, no spares available at all. By the Mangusta, Detomaso had switched to Girlings, although he still used Campy wheels. Lots of companies (Dunlop, Lockheed, Girling, Campagnolo, etc) produced disc brakes in the early days. As disc brakes became a standard technology these companies were largely displaced by traditional automotive suppliers.

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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-18-2006, 02:36 PM
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Campy still makes the most expensive bicycle component groupo out there. Weather it is the best or not is debatable... but it is definately the prettiest. THe picture of the Campy Delta Brake above is what I'm still riding with... the old "C" Record Group.

Sprintn
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post #11 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-19-2006, 08:45 PM
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Smile try this site..

campy only.................all 3 of my bike have campagnolo record parts....freinds don't let freinds ride.shimano........ oh yes, a few more thoughts,shimano might make good parts, but look at e-bay or campy only, road bike review,,,,,,,,,,,,you don't see 1980' shimano brakes going for $1200.00 or , 1970' campy pedals ti spindle going for $100.00's of dollars....you can crash on a campy part and rebuild it , you crash on a shimano part...you buy a new one,also all campy 10 speed parts interchange, as do all 9 and 8 speeed parts, up till recently, shimano did not.

Last edited by bianchi1; 03-19-2006 at 08:51 PM.
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post #12 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-21-2006, 02:10 PM
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Campy is still strong, and has a forceful presence in the US. I work for a bicycle race mechanics team that they sponsored for a few years. It's just too bad we didn't also have an Italian auto sponsor! Campy bicycle components are having a hard time these days in the US due to a poor Euro exchange rate, and some rather aggressive competitive measures from the Japanese components.
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