Restoring and building a Milano track / Lemons car - Page 3 - Alfa Romeo Bulletin Board & Forums

 1Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #31 of 38 (permalink) Old 01-08-2017, 10:02 PM
Senior Member
Gold Subscriber
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,825
I would contact Bill at Alfa Parts Exchange about buying a complete Milano brake none ABS system. I have a 1987 Milano Silver and a 1988 Milano Verde that was purchased new in December 1988. I have a complete ABS system, extra ABS master cylinder and several electric pumps that I purchased over the years to keep my system working. I would also call Bill and see if he has ABS parts if you want to keep your system. I personally do not like to modify my old Alfas. I really want to buy a new Giulia QV and get rid of the old Milanos because neither car has air bags and I like to drive an Alfa with 510 horsepower.
kuni123456 is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #32 of 38 (permalink) Old 01-09-2017, 06:29 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 89
glad to see you are making progress. prep is a lonely and sometimes uncomfortable endeavor w no sex appeal, yet, it is key to any hope for success. replace all the guibos and center support - that stuff is all toast. i believe the nose bushing doodad is NLA. try difatta, jon norman or dean russel (trail auto). if anyone has this part, it will be one of those. if not, will need a new drive shaft. also, not a bad idea to look at the bushing in flywheel.
as far as i know, there is no such thing as a poly transaxle mount, nor should there be. poly is a very bad choice for engine and trans mounts.
not sure what you mean about Milano "finesse" vs german "meticulousness". milanos have one of the highest reliability records in lemons. once you get the car sorted will be very good for you as long as you don't do anything especially stupid (a little stupid is generally OK). endurance racing is R-E-A-L-L-Y hard on cars. do what you can to eliminate all the failure points you can see - there will still be plenty of unforeseen stuff to fix (stinking hot and under enormous time pressure). btw, a good idea when you buy a part for the car, buy 2 - one for spares.
good luck.
barboncino105 is offline  
post #33 of 38 (permalink) Old 01-09-2017, 07:40 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: North Liberty, Iowa
Posts: 376
Giubos

When you replace the rear giubo be sure to trial fit it to the clutch shaft first. On 2 occasions we have found the hole was too small for the giubo to seat properly. A little clearancing with a dremel and sanding drum solved the issue. We lost a day and a half of racing and 2 clutch housing covers to this problem before we were able to figure it out. Since that time we have 3 years and several hundred hours on the same set of giubos with no failures.
Eman911 is offline  
 
post #34 of 38 (permalink) Old 01-14-2017, 11:14 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by barboncino105 View Post
glad to see you are making progress. prep is a lonely and sometimes uncomfortable endeavor w no sex appeal, yet, it is key to any hope for success. replace all the guibos and center support - that stuff is all toast. i believe the nose bushing doodad is NLA. try difatta, jon norman or dean russel (trail auto). if anyone has this part, it will be one of those. if not, will need a new drive shaft. also, not a bad idea to look at the bushing in flywheel.
as far as i know, there is no such thing as a poly transaxle mount, nor should there be. poly is a very bad choice for engine and trans mounts.
not sure what you mean about Milano "finesse" vs german "meticulousness". milanos have one of the highest reliability records in lemons. once you get the car sorted will be very good for you as long as you don't do anything especially stupid (a little stupid is generally OK). endurance racing is R-E-A-L-L-Y hard on cars. do what you can to eliminate all the failure points you can see - there will still be plenty of unforeseen stuff to fix (stinking hot and under enormous time pressure). btw, a good idea when you buy a part for the car, buy 2 - one for spares.
good luck.
Prep is sexy enough; I love the satisfaction of it, as opposed to abstractions in spreadsheets and powerpoints, so it's relative, I guess

Re:The meticulousness as relative to Porsches... Porsche parts and systems are very tight, clearances are an order of magnitude finer in many respects than for most other manufacturers. It's actually pretty well expressed in the post above, where the guibo needs a bit of clearancing and then it's reliable for significant length. But yes, in the sorting of it, this is where they are the same. Noteworthy: 944s have a bad Lemons record, to be sure, which is one reason why I'm here... another is Busso!

The points you made that were really interesting was in spares and failure points. I plan on ensuring we fully renew the brakes (have Tarox in mind) and front wheel bearings as preventative. We'll be sure to have a spare water pump on hand to be sure, what other essentials do you think we should have on hand or under review, in terms of spares or prep? This feedback would be solid gold for us, so I thank you in advance.

Speaking of giving thanks, I think we have got good direction and guidance on the driveline from all the contributors to the thread, really appreciate this support on what I think may be the achilles of these cars. Gonna knock out the clutch, slave and hose next while we wait for parts to arrive. Reading the procedure, it's definitely going to be the most interesting clutch job I've ever done, and a Porsche 968 has a little window thing where you leave the driveline IN the car when swapping out the friction disk. I love some of these Italian idiosyncrasies, like that transmission tilt to access the clutch bellhousing deal, it does make the car more endearing in a way.
Seth Ruden is offline  
post #35 of 38 (permalink) Old 01-14-2017, 04:56 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: North Liberty, Iowa
Posts: 376
We have been running Milano front brakes and Spider rears on our Chump Alfetta. We use Porterfield R4E pads front and rear. Rotors are Centerline of the shelf items. Front rotors lasted 3 seasons (300 hrs of racing) rears lasted 2. Ate 200 brake fluid. Front pads are good for 24-36 hours, rears 14-24. No one out brakes us. I would expect the Milano to go through pads a little quicker due to the higher weight and speed.

We used the clutch disc that was in the car (Sachs maybe?) for three seasons before the hub broke out. Tried to replace it with a Centerline replacement disc but the splined portion of the hub was wrong. We ended up using another used one from a parts car, when I pulled the clutch mid season to replace synchros I found the hub cracked again. The lining material was fine but pay close attention to the hubs. Richard Jemison recommends solid hub clutches from Clutchnet.com so that will be what we try next.

On a related note, TAKE CARE OF YOUR SYNCHROS! Use only Redline gearlube in the trans. Make sure all of your drivers are rev matching on down shifts and not trying trying to speed shift. If they aren't, beat them about the head and neck until they do.

Last edited by Eman911; 01-14-2017 at 05:08 PM.
Eman911 is offline  
post #36 of 38 (permalink) Old 03-15-2017, 11:02 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 989
Made some progress today. Cits been quiet since we pulled the driveshaft a few months back and discovered it was trashed on multiple places. So we sourced a good used one from APE.

Tonight we patches the rear section of the exhaust. The hangers rotted and stretched enough to allow the rear section to fall onto the rear axle and wear a home through. For the initial drive home we bungee corded it up high enough so it didn't rub. But since we are on a budget and the rear section is an Ansa and relatively new we decided to patch it. Seth busted out his new welder tonight and voila, good as new! Or something like that.

I'm looking forward to getting a good driveshaft back in it and driving it with a leak-free exhaust. We also had a leak at the front manifold to downpipe joint which I solved as well.
Attached Images
 
archeologist is offline  
post #37 of 38 (permalink) Old 03-16-2017, 07:06 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 89
when you get time, try to eliminate the whole tail muffler part. run something out under the car in front of the rear wheels. saves a bunch of weight.
barboncino105 is offline  
post #38 of 38 (permalink) Old 03-16-2017, 04:10 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 989
Quote:
Originally Posted by barboncino105 View Post
when you get time, try to eliminate the whole tail muffler part. run something out under the car in front of the rear wheels. saves a bunch of weight.
We will eventually. We're in "just get it running and reliable mode" right now, so saving the $50 or whatever it will cost us to have a custom rear section made up.

Ian Lomax - Current: 1973 Berlina, 1987 Milano Platinum "racecar"
Past: 71, 74 Spiders, 2x 74 Berlina, 74 GTV, 76 Alfetta GT, 88 Milano 3.0, 164LS
archeologist is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Alfa Romeo Bulletin Board & Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome